Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds

00:00

[Music]

00:07

night owl although I've been waking up

00:10

earlier and I quite enjoy my quiet

00:12

mornings but yeah night out I mean come

00:17

on these are the hardest questions you

00:19

can't pin cats against dogs like

00:21

everyone loves both but but dogs

00:23

[Music]

we had a lot of goals when we launched on his team the first was to bring a low-calorie drink to market and make it widely available but another was to find ways to help connect people more closely to the natural world and to support ecosystems that are really under threat. so we're in Paraguay which is the world's largest producer of organic cane sugar. we've come here to gain a fuller appreciation of the communities and the ecosystem that helped us bring this crop to market. I like to get my hands dirty literally. I mean obviously I'm not working eight hours a day like these workers are in the field but it helps to make sure that I never take for granted all that's involved in getting these products out of the earth and getting them into a bottle of tea. it helps start the start the germination sugarcane is a vital part of the Paraguayan economy and each year more farmers are making the switch to organic. it starts from the ground up with natural fertilizers cultivated in this compost field and continues in the lab where these researchers are developing alternatives to chemical pesticides by breeding tiny wasps to control cane worms when we can see a school like this that really is supported by or commitment to organic and fair trade that really makes a material difference in this community every time we buy a pound of fair trade sugar a portion of our purchase goes back to the farmers and sometimes these premiums are used to buy ambulances and modern farm equipment that helps the farmers increase yields and sometimes they go to help community members who need an extra hand they have a small plantation of king Organic King this is the original house that this family lived in and it it's a very basic construction literally sticks and mud and a dirt floor but they've been working in this fields for sixty years and so what's nice now is that the co-operative provided them when they came and built a house for them you know it's so easy when you see a product on the Shelf to just be disconnected not only from the earth and the ecosystem it comes from but also from the people involved at the end of the day making a better product is about more than just better taste it's also about long-term investments in the environment the farmers and their communities

we wanted to learn more about where the

tea for our raspberry tea comes from the

people picking the tea leaves and the

fair trade partnerships that we have

with the community so earlier this year

I traveled to Tamil Nadu in India to

visit the core Kunda tea garden the tea

garden is 6,400 feet above sea level

so it was a long hilly drive the tea

leaves are rather picked by hand or with

special shears the tea workers pick the

top two leaves in the bud off the plants

here's the two leaves one two in the bud

it's much more full than mine once the

teams have been picked they're weighed

and then shipped off to the processing

center

two-thirds of the land is still

rainforest which helps explain why

there's so much biodiversity the

landscapes in Korakuen de are amazing

but the most cherished asset in the

community is the school that's supported

by Fairtrade funds in fact the school is

so impressive that people from

surrounding communities try to get their

children into the school even if the

parents don't work in the tea garden we

were warmly welcomed and even treat it

to a local version of the hokey-pokey

just for fun I brought along stomp

rockets Ettore my sons and I have always

enjoyed and we even managed to get one

stuck on the roof

English (auto-generated)

 

we wanted to learn more about the Tulsi

plant where it comes from and who grows

it so a few weeks ago I visited

Bengaluru in India to see it firsthand

the first time we visited was four acres

owned by a farmer and his wife the power

only comes on for three hours a day in

Bengaluru and it just so happened that

when we were there the power came on

about my shorts so when the water

started pumping into the field it was

time to plant the Tulsi seedlings it

took a few tries to learn how to plant

them the right way

cows roam freely in India so you have to

watch your step

tulsi is also known as holy basil and

the herb is made into Garland's that are

used in Hindu ceremonies during my visit

our supplier and I cut the ribbon on a

new Tulsi drying facility

so first I'm gonna just thank everyone

for their welcome and their hospitality

but looking a lot it is hit it out again

first we're very proud of it because

it's a great ingredient that they supply

but we're also very proud of it because

we know that behind the ingredient is a

great people who bring a great deal of

integrity the farmers can sell freshly

picked ulsi for about 14 cents a kilo

not that much when they sell it as

Garland's they can sell it for 36 cents

a kilo but when they can sell Tulsi in

its dried form they can sell it for 3

dollars and 70 cents a kilo the new

drying shed allows the community to

capture more than 20 times the value of

freshly picked ulsi so it's a very basic

implements that we're talking about here

there's no harvester or tractor I also

got to meet with several dozen local

farmers and explain to them why organics

is important to American consumers and a

great economic opportunity for the

farmers so consumers look for organic

very much wheat

I made a covenant on the opportunity to

meet these farmers and learn more about

the spiritual role Tulsi plays in India

made me even more excited to share this

wondrous plant with our consumers

you

 

we had a lot of goals when we launched on his team the first was to bring a low-calorie drink to market and make it widely available but another was to find ways to help connect people more closely to the natural world and to support ecosystems that are really under threat. so we're in Paraguay which is the world's largest producer of organic cane sugar. we've come here to gain a fuller appreciation of the communities and the ecosystem that helped us bring this crop to market. I like to get my hands dirty literally. I mean obviously I'm not working eight hours a day like these workers are in the field but it helps to make sure that I never take for granted all that's involved in getting these products out of the earth and getting them into a bottle of tea. it helps start the start the germination sugarcane is a vital part of the Paraguayan economy and each year more farmers are making the switch to organic. it starts from the ground up with natural fertilizers cultivated in this compost field and continues in the lab where these researchers are developing alternatives to chemical pesticides by breeding tiny wasps to control cane worms when we can see a school like this that really is supported by or commitment to organic and fair trade that really makes a material difference in this community every time we buy a pound of fair trade sugar a portion of our purchase goes back to the farmers and sometimes these premiums are used to buy ambulances and modern farm equipment that helps the farmers increase yields and sometimes they go to help community members who need an extra hand they have a small plantation of king Organic King this is the original house that this family lived in and it it's a very basic construction literally sticks and mud and a dirt floor but they've been working in this fields for sixty years and so what's nice now is that the co-operative provided them when they came and built a house for them you know it's so easy when you see a product on the Shelf to just be disconnected not only from the earth and the ecosystem it comes from but also from the people involved at the end of the day making a better product is about more than just better taste it's also about long-term investments in the environment the farmers and their communities

we had a lot of goals when we launched on his team the first was to bring a low-calorie drink to market and make it widely available but another was to find ways to help connect people more closely to the natural world and to support ecosystems that are really under threat. so we're in Paraguay which is the world's largest producer of organic cane sugar. we've come here to gain a fuller appreciation of the communities and the ecosystem that helped us bring this crop to market. I like to get my hands dirty literally. I mean obviously I'm not working eight hours a day like these workers are in the field but it helps to make sure that I never take for granted all that's involved in getting these products out of the earth and getting them into a bottle of tea. it helps start the start the germination sugarcane is a vital part of the Paraguayan economy and each year more farmers are making the switch to organic. it starts from the ground up with natural fertilizers cultivated in this compost field and continues in the lab where these researchers are developing alternatives to chemical pesticides by breeding tiny wasps to control cane worms when we can see a school like this that really is supported by or commitment to organic and fair trade that really makes a material difference in this community every time we buy a pound of fair trade sugar a portion of our purchase goes back to the farmers and sometimes these premiums are used to buy ambulances and modern farm equipment that helps the farmers increase yields and sometimes they go to help community members who need an extra hand they have a small plantation of king Organic King this is the original house that this family lived in and it it's a very basic construction literally sticks and mud and a dirt floor but they've been working in this fields for sixty years and so what's nice now is that the co-operative provided them when they came and built a house for them you know it's so easy when you see a product on the Shelf to just be disconnected not only from the earth and the ecosystem it comes from but also from the people involved at the end of the day making a better product is about more than just better taste it's also about long-term investments in the environment the farmers and their communities

we had a lot of goals when we launched on his team the first was to bring a low-calorie drink to market and make it widely available but another was to find ways to help connect people more closely to the natural world and to support ecosystems that are really under threat. so we're in Paraguay which is the world's largest producer of organic cane sugar. we've come here to gain a fuller appreciation of the communities and the ecosystem that helped us bring this crop to market. I like to get my hands dirty literally. I mean obviously I'm not working eight hours a day like these workers are in the field but it helps to make sure that I never take for granted all that's involved in getting these products out of the earth and getting them into a bottle of tea. it helps start the start the germination sugarcane is a vital part of the Paraguayan economy and each year more farmers are making the switch to organic. it starts from the ground up with natural fertilizers cultivated in this compost field and continues in the lab where these researchers are developing alternatives to chemical pesticides by breeding tiny wasps to control cane worms when we can see a school like this that really is supported by or commitment to organic and fair trade that really makes a material difference in this community every time we buy a pound of fair trade sugar a portion of our purchase goes back to the farmers and sometimes these premiums are used to buy ambulances and modern farm equipment that helps the farmers increase yields and sometimes they go to help community members who need an extra hand they have a small plantation of king Organic King this is the original house that this family lived in and it it's a very basic construction literally sticks and mud and a dirt floor but they've been working in this fields for sixty years and so what's nice now is that the co-operative provided them when they came and built a house for them you know it's so easy when you see a product on the Shelf to just be disconnected not only from the earth and the ecosystem it comes from but also from the people involved at the end of the day making a better product is about more than just better taste it's also about long-term investments in the environment the farmers and their communities

we had a lot of goals when we launched on his team the first was to bring a low-calorie drink to market and make it widely available but another was to find ways to help connect people more closely to the natural world and to support ecosystems that are really under threat. so we're in Paraguay which is the world's largest producer of organic cane sugar. we've come here to gain a fuller appreciation of the communities and the ecosystem that helped us bring this crop to market. I like to get my hands dirty literally. I mean obviously I'm not working eight hours a day like these workers are in the field but it helps to make sure that I never take for granted all that's involved in getting these products out of the earth and getting them into a bottle of tea. it helps start the start the germination sugarcane is a vital part of the Paraguayan economy and each year more farmers are making the switch to organic. it starts from the ground up with natural fertilizers cultivated in this compost field and continues in the lab where these researchers are developing alternatives to chemical pesticides by breeding tiny wasps to control cane worms when we can see a school like this that really is supported by or commitment to organic and fair trade that really makes a material difference in this community every time we buy a pound of fair trade sugar a portion of our purchase goes back to the farmers and sometimes these premiums are used to buy ambulances and modern farm equipment that helps the farmers increase yields and sometimes they go to help community members who need an extra hand they have a small plantation of king Organic King this is the original house that this family lived in and it it's a very basic construction literally sticks and mud and a dirt floor but they've been working in this fields for sixty years and so what's nice now is that the co-operative provided them when they came and built a house for them you know it's so easy when you see a product on the Shelf to just be disconnected not only from the earth and the ecosystem it comes from but also from the people involved at the end of the day making a better product is about more than just better taste it's also about long-term investments in the environment the farmers and their communities

we wanted to learn more about where the

tea for our raspberry tea comes from the

people picking the tea leaves and the

fair trade partnerships that we have

with the community so earlier this year

I traveled to Tamil Nadu in India to

visit the core Kunda tea garden the tea

garden is 6,400 feet above sea level

so it was a long hilly drive the tea

leaves are rather picked by hand or with

special shears the tea workers pick the

top two leaves in the bud off the plants

here's the two leaves one two in the bud

it's much more full than mine once the

teams have been picked they're weighed

and then shipped off to the processing

center

two-thirds of the land is still

rainforest which helps explain why

there's so much biodiversity the

landscapes in Korakuen de are amazing

but the most cherished asset in the

community is the school that's supported

by Fairtrade funds in fact the school is

so impressive that people from

surrounding communities try to get their

children into the school even if the

parents don't work in the tea garden we

were warmly welcomed and even treat it

to a local version of the hokey-pokey

just for fun I brought along stomp

rockets Ettore my sons and I have always

enjoyed and we even managed to get one

stuck on the roof

English (auto-generated)

 

we wanted to learn more about where the

tea for our raspberry tea comes from the

people picking the tea leaves and the

fair trade partnerships that we have

with the community so earlier this year

I traveled to Tamil Nadu in India to

visit the core Kunda tea garden the tea

garden is 6,400 feet above sea level

so it was a long hilly drive the tea

leaves are rather picked by hand or with

special shears the tea workers pick the

top two leaves in the bud off the plants

here's the two leaves one two in the bud

it's much more full than mine once the

teams have been picked they're weighed

and then shipped off to the processing

center

two-thirds of the land is still

rainforest which helps explain why

there's so much biodiversity the

landscapes in Korakuen de are amazing

but the most cherished asset in the

community is the school that's supported

by Fairtrade funds in fact the school is

so impressive that people from

surrounding communities try to get their

children into the school even if the

parents don't work in the tea garden we

were warmly welcomed and even treat it

to a local version of the hokey-pokey

just for fun I brought along stomp

rockets Ettore my sons and I have always

enjoyed and we even managed to get one

stuck on the roof

English (auto-generated)