00:00

[Music]

00:01

part of our goal is that all the

00:03

students that participate on the crew

00:05

get to use this as an opportunity to

00:07

launch their careers this program has

00:11

been a huge learning experience it was

00:14

really exciting to see these companies

00:16

so supportive of jumping filmmakers I

00:19

want to tell a story through a set it

00:22

feels like you're like coming out of the

00:24

jungle and into like the neon part and I

00:26

feel like that was the perfect way to

00:28

incorporate the two worlds since we're

00:30

playing a lot with the jungle theme and

00:32

with animals the idea that they could be

00:35

wearing something reminiscent of the

00:36

animal that they're portraying is

00:38

helpful in telling the story about the

00:40

neon jungle the comedy aspect I think is

00:44

a huge part of what the short is about

00:46

and the voice-over narrator I think this

00:48

kind of sets it apart in this new

00:50

comedic way that every movie we've never

00:52

seen before

00:53

[Music]

00:57

it's super important for programs like

01:00

coca-cola refreshing films to exist

01:02

because it gives young filmmakers like

01:04

myself and our entire team the platform

01:06

to practice the things that we want to

01:09

do in our career

01:12

[Music]

00:00

the coca-cola of refreshing films

00:02

program is about giving us student

00:05

filmmakers a chance to make something

00:07

that is on a professional scale to give

00:10

us a real challenge and to make

00:11

something that a lot of people will see

00:13

action it was a great opportunity to be

00:16

creative but I thought magic it's a

00:18

concept that you can quickly relate to

00:20

the combination of popcorn and coca-cola

00:22

and go into the movies I think he's done

00:25

a really good job writing a script

00:27

that's fun and make sense and also gets

00:29

across the advertising elements that he

00:31

brings in with coca-cola

00:34

the practicality of Columbia was one of

00:37

the reasons that I chose Konya we get to

00:39

be on set almost every day for most of

00:43

the classes it's a really good

00:44

opportunity for us to practice what

00:47

people do on professional sets you want

00:49

to make it look professional make it

00:51

look cinematic and the red camera and

00:53

size lenses have been essential for that

00:54

one's choice is so key in telling a

00:57

story I mean it's subtle but at the same

00:59

time is so impactful in an artistic way

01:03

this was one of the best collaboration

01:05

that of experience so far it's a great

01:09

opportunity it could be a big exposure

01:11

for students it's so much fun

01:14

it's challenging in a really good way

01:17

everyone knows what they're doing and

01:20

they also know other people's job so the

01:22

communication is very OnPoint while

01:25

making a call at commercial it's it's

01:28

incredible there's only so many times

01:30

that you'll get to do something like

01:31

this and that's that's all invaluable

01:37

[Applause]

00:01

there's just nothing more rewarding than

00:03

seeing your vision come to life right in

00:05

front of you and seeing the camera

00:07

capture it so beautifully it's really

00:09

great to get this type of opportunity at

00:11

such a young age like I don't think we

00:12

ever thought that we would be working

00:13

with coca-cola my favorite part of being

00:16

on set is just the overall energy that

00:18

energy bleeds from the crew into the

00:21

cast and then the energy on screen just

00:23

ends up being really vibrant and amazing

00:26

it's almost like a beautiful machine

00:28

running all at once and you're just

00:31

chugging forward the whole time it

00:34

becomes this puzzle that can only be

00:36

solved if everybody puts in their piece

00:38

and then you finally get to see on the

00:40

monitor the final frame it's just very

00:42

gratifying oh my god there's gonna be

00:47

like right at the top cut and that's a

00:51

wrap everybody

00:54

[Applause]

00:00

see you Charlie pig what this is a

00:05

really important experience for student

00:07

filmmakers getting ready to go out into

00:09

the world because it's one thing to make

00:11

a student film in isolation it's another

00:14

skill set entirely to be able to make

00:16

something on behalf of the client it's a

00:19

professional project and looking 80

00:21

people is a mind-blowing and

00:23

breathtaking it's like feeling in

00:25

Hollywood you know they're coordinating

00:27

heavy visual effects to shooting

00:29

locations a set build there's been a lot

00:34

of challenges but it's also been such a

00:36

gratifying and and emotionally brilliant

00:39

experience everyone's doing their best

00:42

on this project as we all want it to be

00:44

the best commercial it reminds me that I

00:46

care for these people and I care how

00:49

much work they're going into the project

00:51

and other thing fall for the experience

00:54

[Music]

00:56

[Applause]

00:04

coca-cola refreshing films gave us this

00:07

great opportunity to bring our ideas to

00:10

life just a step away is so unique with

00:13

how musicals have such a different

00:14

energy than any other type of art and

00:16

it's really exciting her bring that to

00:19

coca-cola refreshing films for the first

00:21

time started I think at 8:00 p.m. it's

00:23

6:00 a.m. right now but it's such a cool

00:25

team everyone is really fun everyone's

00:27

working really hard

00:29

the program has partnered with Fred

00:30

sighs that new film it's another way of

00:32

making the program as professional as

00:35

possible working with bread and Zeiss

00:37

was great it's helped elevate the look

00:41

of our film this crew is different

00:43

because it's very female dominated it's

00:46

so nice to Jana fat and feed so many

00:49

women and so many people of color we

00:51

need representation what's giving me an

00:53

eye the second we got together as a team

00:54

we knew that this was gonna be our

00:56

chance to give women a chance this spot

01:00

has so much heart some music in

01:03

combination with just every one of the

01:05

captures how special it is to go to the

01:07

movie

01:08

[Music]

01:09

[Applause]

01:12

[Music]

01:14

you

00:00

I'm Lily I'm Nicole and we're from UNLV

00:02

enjoy our film

00:03

[Music]

00:10

I can grant you one wish I wish I was in

00:14

my happy place

00:15

[Music]

00:27

[Music]

00:29

this would have been my wish too

00:33

[Music]

00:00

I'm Cooper I'm Tyler we're from NYU

00:01

enjoy our film wait how do I send it

00:06

emoji

00:07

dad emojis are right here you didn't

00:10

know that I've the tickets here buy them

00:13

on your fault yeah you didn't know that

00:15

[Music]

00:28

is perfect you didn't know that

00:31

[Music]

00:00

I'm Jamie and I'm Thais, we're from The New School. Enjoy our film

00:03

(typing on phone)

00:24

Can you believe that ending?

00:26

Oh my god

00:27

The visual effects were so good

00:29

We have to watch the next one together.

00:00

I'm Nathan, and I'm Elon, we're from UCLA

00:02

Enjoy our film

00:05

(soft drink crackles)

00:27

Let's go!

00:28

Movie's starting

00:00

Hi I'm Max, I'm Ron, and we go to Columbia University.

00:03

Enjoy our film

00:05

(cameras flashing, and crowd talking)

00:12

(crowd cheering)

00:00

Hi I'm Clara and I'm Eva and were from Ithaca College. Enjoy our film

00:10

Jack want to see a movie.

00:11

I'd be down to see a movie

00:12

I'm in. What movie we gonna see?

00:14

Popcorn would taste so good with this Coke right now.

00:17

Hey! I'll drive us to Regal

00:00

Hey I'm Golden, hi I'm Jessie, and we're from UCLA. Enjoy our film

00:06

Hey!

00:07

Just in time for the movie

00:00

Hi I'm Mika and I'm Amanda and we're from the School of Visual Arts. Enjoy our film

00:05

Hey, so sorry I'm late. Come on, let's go grab our seats.

00:08

Oh, do you want anyth-

00:14

I have to take this

00:22

Love you too Mom

00:29

(clears throat)

00:00

Hi, I'm Patrick and I'm Hunter. We're from Elon University. Enjoy our film

00:10

(beep)

00:11

(popcorn popping)

00:12

(Coke sizzles)

00:14

(electronic music)

00:25

00:00

hi and welcome to episode 2 of this ICA

00:02

vlog my name is Sneha Patel I'm the

00:04

cinema sales director for the Americas

00:06

and I'm really happy to be presenting

00:09

this to you I know a lot of people are

00:10

staying at home and trying to you know

00:12

be cognizant of the social distancing

00:15

well this is a great time to learn some

00:17

new stuff and a question that a lot of

00:19

people ask is about the radience lenses

00:21

the supreme prime radiance lenses from

00:23

Zeiss which are very new and are just

00:26

coming into the market people want to

00:28

know what are they about how do you get

00:30

those flare characteristics what are

00:32

Flair's where do they come from how did

00:34

you come up with you know these

00:36

characteristics and program them into

00:38

the lenses and how does it all work and

00:40

what was the whole process we're gonna

00:41

take you through the process from start

00:43

to finish so we're gonna define what

00:45

flares are we're gonna show you how it

00:48

is that we manipulated the coatings and

00:50

lenses to create those flares and then

00:51

show you the results so let's start off

00:54

let's get right into it first of all

00:55

we'd like to thank dr. Benjamin Volker

00:58

for providing this presentation

01:00

originally it was presented during

01:02

camera image Film Festival in the winter

01:05

of 2019 it's a great international film

01:08

festival that takes place in Poland

01:10

which only concentrates on

01:12

cinematography so it's a great forum to

01:15

introduce new technologies and talk

01:17

about new tools as cinematographers can

01:19

use so we were able to do this

01:20

presentation with dr. Benjamin Volker

01:22

who was actually really key in

01:24

developing the Zeiss radiance lenses and

01:26

I'm enhancing his presentation a little

01:28

bit with some edit features and giving

01:31

it to you so let's get started so the

01:33

first thing is let's talk about what is

01:34

a lens flare and define it now a lot of

01:37

people have ideas about what a lens

01:39

flare can be and you really got to break

01:41

it down into the elements of the lens

01:44

that are causing the flare

01:45

characteristics so here we have a very

01:48

interesting photograph of two astronauts

01:50

in space and there's an earth behind

01:53

them and at the same time there is a

01:55

point source of light coming from the

01:56

Sun which is causing flares inside the

01:59

lens itself so the the ghosting that you

02:01

see here you know the inhalation and the

02:05

halo all that is actually coming from

02:07

the interaction with the glass so when

02:10

light passes through the glass

02:12

through the lens you can see in this

02:14

cross-section of a cinema prime lens

02:17

that there are a lot of glass elements

02:19

that the light is going to go through

02:21

until it gets to the end and hits the

02:23

sensor plane so as it's going through

02:26

this class there are some things that

02:28

can happen to it on the way so let's

02:30

examine what that is so if you look at

02:32

these objects in without the light

02:33

source so we're cutting out the Sun all

02:36

together just looking at the illuminated

02:38

objects in a perfect world these

02:40

luminous objects each point on them

02:42

would travel through the lens as a point

02:45

source and come out the other end and

02:47

render itself onto the film plane in

02:49

this case a digital sensor plane so

02:51

that's if there's no you know Sun in the

02:53

picture just perfect illumination and

02:56

you're gonna get a great rendering so if

02:58

you don't have any point source of light

03:00

you're not to worry about it but in in

03:01

this case there is the Sun right so it's

03:04

list put the Sun in there now the Sun is

03:06

illuminating both the earth and the two

03:08

astronauts so that's where the light is

03:11

falling right now the thing is the Sun

03:13

you know this is not a perfect world and

03:16

we're not looking at these objects

03:19

through a pinhole we're looking at them

03:20

through glass so what's gonna happen is

03:22

when the Sun illuminates it's actually

03:25

gonna cause these flares that you see

03:27

over here so let's break down on each of

03:29

the elements that are causing this

03:32

characteristic this ghosting this look

03:34

that we get the first piece of this

03:36

puzzle is the ghosting itself which is

03:38

caused by light reflected the point

03:40

source of light reflected on multiple

03:43

surfaces optical surfaces within the

03:45

lens so it's bouncing around within the

03:47

glass that's inside the lens itself and

03:49

is happening in more than one place at

03:51

once

03:52

therefore you gain this overall soft

03:54

out-of-focus

03:55

ghosting and the ghosting is indicated

03:58

here with the yellow line so you can see

04:00

a circle around the ghosting the

04:02

ghosting is created by the light

04:04

reflecting off of the glass surfaces

04:06

right back and forth and that's why the

04:09

shape even of the ghost is reminiscent

04:12

of what the elements look like inside

04:13

the lens the second part of the flare

04:16

characteristic is the light that's the

04:18

stray light that is caused by the

04:20

scattering off of mechanical services so

04:23

as light comes in and bounces off a

04:25

mechanical

04:25

services and no matter what kind of dark

04:27

matte finish paint you put on the inside

04:29

of a lens or how hard you try to cut

04:32

back any kind of reflections we try very

04:34

very hard they're always going to be

04:36

some kind of light scattering off of

04:37

mechanical services and that is

04:39

indicated by this oval and you can

04:41

almost see the shape actually if you

04:43

look carefully of what looks like to be

04:46

a soft version of the barrel the the

04:48

shape of the lens barrel and that's what

04:50

we're seeing over there and there's

04:52

another piece of the lens flare that is

04:54

caused by the Polish optical service so

04:57

this would be your sensor itself or the

05:00

low-pass filter that's in front of the

05:02

sensor and a lot of digital cinema

05:04

cameras have that low-pass filter

05:06

sensors themselves are quite shiny

05:08

because there are silicon wafers so even

05:10

if you don't have a low-pass filter it's

05:12

still gonna reflect some light back so

05:14

as that life bounces around inside it

05:16

causes a forward scatter halo so that

05:18

effect is right here within the circle a

05:21

halo around the point source of light

05:22

and also coming forward a little bit

05:25

towards us so that mix with the other

05:28

two plus diffraction because diffraction

05:31

is caused by the shape and size of the

05:34

iris the bigger the opening more open

05:37

your irises lower the t stop you're

05:40

gonna see less of this distraction you

05:41

see a softer shape but as you close down

05:44

your iris you're going to see more of

05:45

the star pattern and that's the

05:47

diffraction caused by the light waves

05:50

going through a hole that's not

05:52

infinitesimally large because you know

05:54

your aperture of your camera is a

05:56

certain size so the wavelength of light

05:58

as it's going through it's going to hit

06:00

the edge of the iris and scatter a bit

06:02

and that's what's causing that

06:03

diffraction and you're gonna see that

06:05

diffraction change as your iris opens or

06:08

closes so these four pieces together the

06:11

diffraction the Ford scatter halo the

06:14

stray light and the ghosting together

06:16

really create what you see as the lens

06:19

flare all right now what does the lens

06:22

for look like so you've seen it in

06:23

movies and TV shows you know especially

06:26

when there's a Sun in the background

06:28

behind the characters or a bright source

06:30

of light you get these lens flares

06:33

sometimes you see the shape of the lens

06:36

itself better than other times it just

06:37

depends on the

06:39

and kind of coatings that are on the

06:41

lens so yes coatings are very important

06:43

to this conversation because it's

06:45

through the manipulation of the coatings

06:47

that were able to see certain types of

06:49

flare characteristics so let's talk

06:51

about optical coatings and what they are

06:53

and define them so what is an optical

06:55

coating well it's a coating that you put

06:57

and it's a very very thin layer by the

07:00

way I mean the coatings that we put on

07:02

glass are nanoparticles and they're very

07:05

very tiny they're quite small there are

07:07

300 times smaller than the diameter of a

07:10

human hair so you can see that you know

07:13

it's a very thin piece of material

07:15

that's right there on the glass on the

07:17

Left we see a lens that's been coated

07:19

and on the right we see that lens

07:21

flipped around so that we can see from

07:23

the behind it from the back we don't see

07:25

the coatings from the other side we just

07:27

see the light transmitted really well

07:29

and very very light reflected back out

07:31

towards the light source so that's why

07:34

it looks clear on the right side from

07:36

the back and you can see the coating

07:38

color on the left side so you can see in

07:41

this example over here with these two

07:43

lenses that if you have an uncoated lens

07:46

it's gonna reflect back a lot of the

07:47

light here we have a white light source

07:49

above the lenses and it's reflecting

07:50

back quite a bit on the left side

07:52

because that lens has every single

07:55

element inside uncoated there's no

07:57

coatings whatsoever the lens on the

07:58

right is coated like it normally would

08:01

be with t-star coatings so you can see

08:03

that the light is very very dull and

08:05

reflects back very little on the lens on

08:08

the right side and it lens on the left

08:10

side with no coatings who reflects a lot

08:11

and scatters all over the place so what

08:13

does that result in if you look at the

08:15

photographs on the right side of the

08:16

page you can see on the top and bottom

08:18

picture you know with and without

08:20

coatings what the what the lens does so

08:22

this is the exact same settings and this

08:25

is the same aperture same focusing

08:27

everything's the same just the lens has

08:29

been changed you can see that with the

08:31

lens that's been used with the coatings

08:33

results in an image that's very nicely

08:35

saturated great colors great contrast

08:38

range and a very clear image and the one

08:40

without the coatings the image has less

08:42

exposure has a lot of ghosting and a lot

08:46

of distractions and you can see that

08:47

it's very hard to see the

08:49

and 40 starter coatings was actually

08:51

registered in 1935 so we've been looking

08:55

at anti-reflective coatings for a very

08:56

long time was actually initiated because

08:58

of periscope submarines that were

09:01

surfacing and the periscope needs to see

09:03

at night and if you have a lighthouse

09:05

shining a light and it comes around into

09:08

the periscope it's really good at

09:09

ghosting you're not gonna be able to see

09:11

anything so that was one the onus is for

09:13

creating some kind of coating with

09:15

nanoparticles that would help that

09:17

situation and that led to the patenting

09:20

of t-star coatings in 1935 Alexander

09:23

McCulloch was very very important in

09:26

getting this done he was the head of

09:28

optical service laboratory in Sai Siena

09:31

our original headquarters in the

09:33

southeastern part of Germany and he

09:36

patent this technology and researched it

09:39

and then very soon after it was applied

09:41

into practice so the first T coated

09:44

lenses were single coatings and then

09:47

that was in the 1940s in the 1950s you

09:50

started seeing the multi-layered

09:52

coatings labeled M C from multi-layered

09:55

coating or T star for more than one

09:58

layer of T coating so T star has evolved

10:01

over the years it changes all the time

10:02

as T star evolves it gets better and

10:05

better year by year

10:06

so depending on what your a lens is

10:09

introduced let's say a high-end cinema

10:11

lens like an ultra prime master prime

10:13

with its T star XP coatings master

10:16

anamorphic s-- the formulation of the

10:18

coating that's used in the initial run

10:20

of those lenses has always kept up until

10:22

the end so even now if you purchase a

10:24

master primer master anamorphic lens

10:26

it'll have the same T star formula that

10:29

it did when it was initially introduced

10:31

into the market but every year we

10:33

improve the T star coatings a little bit

10:35

more a little bit more so you could even

10:37

see that difference that slight

10:39

difference in the CP 2s and CP threes

10:41

you can see it in the CP 3 is that they

10:44

do a better job of cutting back

10:46

reflected light and really cut back the

10:49

ghosting quite a bit in comparison to

10:51

the CP 2's so let's start with a bare

10:55

uncoated glass and see what is happening

10:57

and then try to understand what coatings

10:59

do differently so in the uncoated glass

11:02

you have

11:03

reflected light and that reflected light

11:06

is quite a bit when it's uncoated you

11:08

could see that the whole front element

11:10

of the lens lights up white and you get

11:12

a lot of ghosting and a lot of flare

11:14

characteristics and a lot of light

11:16

bouncing around inside heating

11:17

mechanical services and hitting the

11:19

sensor and bouncing around inside the

11:21

lens so what you want to try to do is

11:24

you want to cut back that reflection you

11:26

can see that a glass with high optical

11:28

power there's quite a bit of reflection

11:29

almost nine to ten percent of the light

11:32

is reflected back that's quite a bit so

11:34

what do you do well if you add the

11:36

anti-reflective coating it will cut back

11:38

that reflection that reflectivity now

11:42

the thing is if you have just one layer

11:44

of coating you're gonna cut back let's

11:47

say a very narrow band of colors of

11:50

light so in this case you have a coating

11:53

that's cutting back a lot of blues

11:55

greens and a little bit of yellow light

11:57

but it's letting pass or reflect back a

12:01

lot of orange or red light so that light

12:05

then the type of look that you're gonna

12:07

have over here is that a lot of blue

12:09

will transmit but the warmer colors will

12:11

reflect back this lens will look very

12:14

cool to the look so we put this on a

12:16

camera you're gonna get a cool look

12:18

you're gonna still get ghosting

12:20

especially with the warmer colors but

12:22

you get lows less ghosting with the

12:24

cooler colors now if you use multi

12:27

layers of coating so a multi-layered

12:30

anti-reflective coating like t-star

12:32

coating then you can then dial in the

12:34

reflectivity a bit more and every year

12:38

again it gets better and better

12:39

at trying to cut back the reflectivity

12:41

of all the wavelengths of light instead

12:44

of just a narrow band of wavelength of

12:46

light that is why supreme primes are

12:49

really really clean because they have

12:51

the best t-star coating that you can

12:53

find there are very recent lenses and

12:55

they're very neutral so they're not warm

12:58

they're not cool they're really right

13:00

there in the middle and there's a very

13:01

small band of light that's reflected

13:04

back so if you look at the surface of a

13:06

supreme prime lens I'll have a very

13:08

faint reflection and not a very bright

13:10

one whatsoever and of course the

13:12

ghosting will only be slightly only when

13:15

the light source is pointed

13:16

correctly into the lens and otherwise it

13:19

really holds the contrast range and

13:20

doesn't ghost very easily now if you

13:23

want to take this a step further you can

13:24

get creative by figuring out the

13:27

formulation of the tea start coatings

13:29

that will allow certain spectrums of the

13:32

light to go through and reflect or

13:34

reflect back and others not so in this

13:37

case we've allowed all the other light

13:40

to go through except for a very very

13:43

small band of blue and a little bit

13:46

wider band of yellow and orange and what

13:50

happens here is that you could be

13:51

creative so in the case of the radiance

13:54

lenses we just picked a certain band of

13:56

blue light and let that reflect around

13:59

inside the lens and transmitted

14:02

everything else really really well so

14:04

that results in the blue flare

14:06

characteristic because that's the one

14:08

that's reflecting and bouncing around

14:10

inside the lens and the other stuff is

14:12

just going through all the way so that's

14:14

how you kind of get creative to try to

14:17

figure out like what kind of flare

14:19

characteristic that you want now the

14:21

resulting image is a bit warmer and the

14:23

radiance lenses than the supreme Prime's

14:26

because if you're reflecting back two to

14:28

three percent of blue light a certain

14:31

spectrum of blue then just imagine that

14:33

what the resulting image is going to

14:35

look a little bit less blue so therefore

14:37

a little bit warmer so supreme prime

14:39

radiance are warmer in comparison to

14:41

supreme Prime's so that's a very

14:44

interesting side effect of what we were

14:47

trying to do when we created the

14:48

radiance lenses so let's look at you

14:51

know coding versus no coding because you

14:53

know they're in the market right now

14:54

there are some choices of lenses and

14:56

even super speeds that you can get for

14:58

super 35 sensors forms ice that have

15:00

been uncoated so what is uncoding versus

15:03

coating due to a lens well first of all

15:05

let's try to understand what's going on

15:07

here every optical surface loses some

15:10

kind of transmission to reflective light

15:12

so the reflection is is you know if it's

15:15

not 0% maybe it's point one percent of

15:18

point two percent as you saw with the

15:20

latest he start coatings it's very

15:22

little light and some spectrums have a

15:24

little bit more than others but it's

15:25

very little light that's actually

15:26

reflected back but there is some okay

15:28

now the thing is

15:30

is if you have uncoated lenses there's a

15:32

lot more light reflected back so let's

15:35

look at four different examples on the

15:37

left you have a lens where every single

15:40

element inside the lens was coated with

15:42

the t-star coating with the multi layer

15:44

to start coating and that's why you have

15:46

resulting t15 lens design okay so your

15:50

light transmission wide open is t15 now

15:53

if you just uncoated the front and rear

15:56

element you will get a lot of ghosting

15:58

but now you dropped your T stop a little

16:01

bit to T 1.7 now 50% of the elements

16:04

inside were coated then you would drop

16:06

down to T to 1 and if all of the lenses

16:08

were uncoated inside it would drop down

16:10

at T 2.9 so there's quite a large effect

16:13

that the coatings have in light

16:15

transmission by having an uncoated lens

16:17

you really are cutting back how much

16:19

exposure again on top of the fact that

16:22

you're gonna have a lot less contrast a

16:23

lot more ghosting so let's see what the

16:25

resulting effect is here are a few

16:27

examples with and without to start

16:29

coating uncoated and coated in this case

16:31

we don't have a point source of light so

16:33

there's not gonna be any flare but you

16:34

can clearly see that there's an exposure

16:36

difference between a coated lens and an

16:38

uncoated lens here's another example as

16:41

well where even a very small spectral

16:44

highlight in this case a balance of

16:46

highlights off of the car are already

16:48

ghosting the lens quite a bit and even

16:52

you know in this case where there is no

16:54

direct light source but the flowers are

16:56

quite bright and reflecting you know

16:59

just natural colors back from a light

17:00

source like sunlight coming from a

17:02

window it again has an effect a ghosting

17:05

effect on an uncoated lens and it

17:07

becomes even harsher when there's a

17:08

direct light source I'll give you one

17:10

more example over here where the light

17:11

is just off to the side in the corner

17:13

and it still has quite a large effect we

17:16

don't coat the lenses whatsoever so

17:18

coatings really do play a part in the

17:21

image rendition and you know making sure

17:24

that you get a clean high contrast and

17:26

image necessitates having

17:28

anti-reflective coatings especially

17:30

multi-layered anti-reflective coatings

17:32

on the lenses themselves so how do you

17:35

create a lens flare that's creatively

17:37

that looks good and people want to use

17:41

what do you have to do well first of all

17:43

you have to listen to what everyone's

17:45

asking for so what we did first was get

17:48

a lot of feedback from cinematographers

17:50

about what they're looking for because

17:51

with the advent of the full-frame

17:54

sensors camera sensors and other similar

17:57

camera sensor sizes to full-frame

17:59

full-frame plus let's say like in the

18:01

red monstro the Alexa LF a left mini and

18:04

of course a Sony Venice and other camera

18:06

system see seven hundred and others you

18:08

are starting to see the need in a desire

18:10

to use lenses that cover these larger

18:12

sensors now the thing is we have lots

18:15

and lots of glass that's out there for

18:16

super 35 lots of vintage glass older

18:19

stuff things with cool characteristics

18:22

lots of different choices from many

18:23

manufacturers from over decades of

18:27

inventory but we don't have as many

18:29

choices in full frame or full frame plus

18:32

the choices are starting to come there

18:33

is a lot of new manufacturers and lot a

18:36

new glass coming and a lot of new

18:37

products but the choices are a lot less

18:40

than what you have in super 35 now the

18:42

thing is that means that there's also

18:44

less choices of lenses with

18:45

characteristics that you might want

18:47

because cinematographers sometimes are

18:49

looking for characteristics to let's say

18:51

muddy up the lens a little bit or muddy

18:53

up the image a little bit because they

18:55

want to put a signature look

18:57

onto their project you know not every

18:59

project should look the same so a film

19:01

noir versus the comedy versus you know a

19:04

horror or an action film they're all

19:07

gonna have different kinds of looks

19:08

especially with all the different

19:09

cinematographers out there they're all

19:11

going to put their signature look onto

19:14

the image and a way to do that is to be

19:16

able to use lenses that have cool

19:18

characteristics interesting

19:19

characteristics or character that can

19:22

really apply itself into the image and

19:24

really create something robust and

19:26

unique and different that makes you

19:28

stand out from the crowd so the demand

19:30

for classic lenses is really skyrocketed

19:32

in recent years since the advent of the

19:35

digital cinema technology because

19:36

digital soman technology is very clean

19:38

sensors are very clean compared to film

19:40

and and the way film ran through cameras

19:43

and you know all the other things that

19:44

came with it

19:45

and film was also a 3d medium it's a

19:48

it's a thick piece of plastic if you

19:50

think about it compared to a silicon

19:52

wafer which is very very thin in two

19:54

in a lot of respects so there's a big

19:57

need and drive to find lenses from these

20:00

eras to apply to modern day however

20:03

classic lenses are unreliable at times

20:06

and difficult to service because a lot

20:08

of times they weren't designed for

20:09

things like motors for example to be

20:11

used on set so there are some drawbacks

20:13

so what we did was we went into did some

20:17

research for example one of the places

20:18

we went to his caslo camera in Los

20:20

Angeles and really don't deep into with

20:24

Benjamin and our team to figure out like

20:26

what is it people like about super ball

20:29

tars or Canon K 35 or Cooke speed pink

20:34

rose or SuperSpeed lenses or Kawas what

20:37

is about these you know vintage lenses

20:39

that people like that they're really

20:40

drawn to so the lens techs at caslo were

20:44

able to give us feedback based on what

20:45

they heard or the conversations they

20:47

have with cinematographers as to what

20:49

they liked and one common theme that

20:50

came out of it was blueish flares and

20:53

warm tones and so a lot of these lenses

20:56

were mapped and carefully examined and

20:59

recorded so that we can see what kind of

21:01

characteristics they're exhibiting and

21:03

then you try to consider okay well

21:05

what's the intensity of these flares

21:08

where's the color of the shape the

21:10

behavior where you stop down the lens or

21:11

you open it up the position the frame

21:13

with respect to a light source and the

21:16

overall effect on contrast what are they

21:17

all doing and is it good or is it bad do

21:20

people like it what is it they like

21:22

about it and you really try to

21:23

understand what what they're doing so

21:25

once you have this information you want

21:27

to decide all right well what is the

21:30

look gonna be for this new line of

21:31

lenses these radiance lenses they're

21:33

supreme prime lenses that they're gonna

21:34

be modified and the way we're gonna

21:36

modify them is playing with the coatings

21:38

as we've seen earlier in the

21:39

presentation we're able to do some fun

21:41

things so what are we gonna do well

21:43

we're not just gonna uncut the lenses

21:45

because if we do that we have the

21:46

disadvantages that we talked about you

21:48

know we are gonna lose our contrast you

21:50

have a lot of ghosting it can be very

21:51

hard to use the lens but at the same

21:53

time we want to create our own look be

21:55

consistent over the lock the entire lens

21:57

family so that we have a very similar

21:59

flare characteristic between all the

22:00

different focal lengths we want to be

22:02

controllable meaning that if there's not

22:04

a light source directly point the camera

22:06

it shouldn't flare up and goes

22:09

so that you can make it usable you know

22:11

as long as you flare off the light

22:12

sources it's gonna behave like a regular

22:14

Supreme Prime and you want to have the

22:16

right intensity of flair to you don't

22:18

want to be overpowering or just not

22:20

there enough so you can't even see it at

22:22

all any of course he want to make sure

22:24

that you have a very low loss of light

22:26

transmission because you want still the

22:28

t stop is still gonna be t15 if you do

22:31

your job right and that's exactly what

22:33

happened with the radiance lens is the

22:34

t15 there's seven focal lanes and they

22:36

match really well with one another so

22:38

now that you know what you're trying to

22:40

achieve you figure out how you're gonna

22:42

get there so the first thing we decide

22:44

is that we're gonna modify the T start

22:47

coating and create a t-star blue and the

22:50

T star blue will we'll take a narrow

22:52

band of blue spectrum and it will

22:56

reflect it back more than it reflects

22:58

anything else so it will be the same

23:00

type of anti reflectivities for every

23:02

other piece of the spectrum except for

23:04

blue so we call this T star blue now we

23:06

got to choose which elements inside the

23:09

glass because there's so many of them

23:10

you're going to apply the T star blue

23:13

coating so that you get the right kind a

23:16

combination of ghost and that T star

23:18

blue has to be the right color has to

23:20

render and reflect the right color to

23:23

caused that flare now the thing is if

23:25

you have five elements that you choose

23:27

lens elements inside a lens design you

23:30

could have fifty five individual ghosts

23:32

if you choose fourteen of them you get a

23:34

four hundred six individual ghosts so

23:36

that's a lot well let's say let's take

23:38

the 21 millimeter for example of the

23:40

supreme prime we decided to go with six

23:43

surfaces that we were going to coat

23:45

differently inside there with a t-star

23:46

blue inside a fourteen element lens but

23:50

that means there could be over 200

23:52

million combinations of which of the six

23:55

surfaces in what combination of the

23:57

fourteen you're going to use so we got

23:59

to simulate what these choices will do

24:02

in a computer before we do it in real

24:04

life because we can't keep creating an

24:06

infinite amount of prototypes so that's

24:09

exactly what happened here because Zeiss

24:11

has a super computing technology to be

24:13

able to simulate the flare

24:15

characteristics before you actually see

24:18

it optically in an actual printed design

24:21

or created design so in this case we

24:24

looked at all the different combinations

24:25

and Benjamin Volker spent a lot of time

24:29

figuring out which combinations of the

24:32

different elements are gonna work

24:33

together to create this kind of flare

24:36

characteristic we're looking for on the

24:38

right side we see a computer simulation

24:40

of a flare characteristic of a supreme

24:42

prime 21 that we settled on but in the

24:45

interim there were a lot of different

24:47

experiments because you have to figure

24:48

out what spectrum of blue light you

24:50

wanted to reflect back what that

24:52

spectrum is going to look like is it

24:53

warm or is it cooler how you gonna push

24:55

it you wanted to know how many elements

24:57

inside the glass you want to coat with

25:00

these t-star blue treatment and you want

25:02

to know exactly you know the intensity

25:05

that you're trying to go for

25:06

so it took a bunch of experimentation a

25:09

lot of you know trial and error but on a

25:11

computer system so it didn't have to be

25:14

happen with actual products you didn't

25:16

have to actually create the lens this

25:17

was all done in the computer and then

25:19

finally on the seven focal lengths we

25:22

settled upon a set of flare

25:24

characteristics that we really really

25:25

liked and that worked well with one

25:28

another so here you see the supreme

25:29

prime 25 through 100 and this is the

25:32

radiance version and in each one the

25:35

elements were chosen specifically inside

25:38

the lens design to give that kind of

25:40

reflectivity that's gonna result in the

25:42

ghosting that we're looking for the

25:44

flare characteristics that we're looking

25:45

for so these were all designed you can

25:47

see the flares at different T stops here

25:49

t 1 5 t to 85 6 this was all purposely

25:53

chosen and picked to work out this way

25:55

so then you have to go from design to

25:58

implementation so when we actually built

26:01

the lens design the optical prototypes

26:04

and tested them with the kind of T star

26:07

coding application that was planned

26:09

through the computer simulation it

26:11

worked out perfectly on the left you see

26:13

a supreme prime 35 millimeter shot at t2

26:17

a in camera and with a point light

26:20

source and you're seeing the kind of

26:22

flare characteristics you get on the

26:23

right you're looking at the computer

26:26

simulation of the exact same settings a

26:28

supreme prime radiance 35 so you can see

26:31

the simulation was very very close in

26:33

nature to what

26:35

came out of the camera and which means

26:37

that by designing in a computer system

26:39

we were able to do something which would

26:42

practically be impossible if these

26:44

lenses had to be created in prototypes

26:45

because you would have to go through

26:46

hundreds maybe thousands of different

26:48

prototypes and combinations before you

26:50

found what really works well together so

26:53

using modern technology and using modern

26:56

science you're able to figure out from

26:58

the get-go what you're looking for and

27:00

design it that way and that's exactly

27:02

what we did with the supreme prime

27:03

radiance lenses from the 21 through the

27:06

100 millimeter you can see the result

27:08

here at t15 t28 and t56

27:12

all shot in a camera so let's take a

27:15

look at a comparison video that shows us

27:18

the difference between the original

27:20

supreme primes and the supreme prime

27:22

radiance lenses

27:24

[Music]

28:51

here we have a video from Rodrigo create

28:54

Oh a SC giving his thoughts about what

28:57

he thought about the radiance for lenses

28:58

when he used it for a special project

29:00

called R&R the job of a cinematographer

29:02

is to choose the elements and the tools

29:05

were gonna use to tell a story to help

29:08

tell a story

29:09

RNR actually means receive and release

29:12

prisoners are admitted in and parolees

29:15

are let out the image that came to my

29:18

mind was of a person leaving prison and

29:21

seeing out the windows as as a person's

29:24

walking down the hallway and the flare

29:26

that I would cause and the flare

29:29

represents many things in this case but

29:31

maybe it's hope maybe it's you know the

29:34

Sun outside it's something to reach for

29:37

so the light sources became a very very

29:40

important point of the story and the

29:43

lenses allowed me to utilize the

29:46

characteristics of them for storytelling

29:48

[Music]

29:50

my name is Rodrigo Prieta and I was a

29:52

director and cinematographer of R&R

30:00

thank you so much for joining us today

30:02

for the city of log episode two I hope

30:05

you learned something today and really

30:07

got some great information if you want

30:08

more information you could actually

30:09

click on this link over here lens spires

30:13

ice comm if you look for an article from

30:16

Ghostbuster to ghost father you're gonna

30:18

be able to see a full short film

30:20

directed by Paul Mignot called all blood

30:22

runs read with copious use of the

30:25

radiance lenses and you're going to be

30:27

able to see some really cool use of

30:29

these lens characteristics for a

30:31

dramatic short film and you'll be able

30:33

to read all this information that I just

30:35

gave you an article form so you can get

30:37

better versed at exactly what's going on

30:39

here it's exciting technology it's a lot

30:42

of fun and we really encourage you to

30:44

try out the radiance lenses for yourself

30:45

so for your upcoming projects consider

30:48

it it might be the kind of look that

30:50

you're looking for and again it's the

30:52

same lenses as the supreme primes but

30:54

with a different treatment of coating

30:55

that causes these flare characteristics

30:57

so I hope you got something out of

30:59

today's episode and please give us your

31:01

feedback and let's get information about

31:04

what we should talk about in the next

31:05

episode all right take care everybody

31:07

and be safe

00:00

hi my name is neho patel i'm the cinema

00:02

sales director for zeiss

00:04

in the americas and i know a lot of

00:06

people are home right now

00:08

uh you know because of the virus that's

00:10

going around and it's better to be home

00:12

and do social distancing

00:13

so what we decided to do is keep up our

00:16

educational

00:18

plans that we always are trying to you

00:20

know work with the community and

00:22

do more educational stuff so what we've

00:24

done is we put together

00:26

this first ever zeiss cine vlog

00:29

and this vlog first episode we're going

00:31

to talk about how to create

00:33

a cinematic look with your camera system

00:36

and uh you know hopefully answer some

00:38

questions and then

00:39

if we get some interactivity then we'll

00:42

have new questions that we can answer

00:43

for

00:44

the episode number two so please

00:46

interact you know if this is on facebook

00:48

youtube or wherever else you see this

00:49

video

00:50

go ahead and comment and let us know

00:52

what kind of questions you have

00:53

about camera and optics and let's get

00:56

right to it so

00:57

this presentation is about you know

00:59

cinematic look but it's going to apply

01:00

to any kind of digital camera system

01:02

that you want to use so

01:04

everything from dslr all the way up to

01:06

the highest end of

01:07

digital cinema cameras that you see

01:09

right now in the market

01:10

uh like the red monstro or red helium

01:14

the sony venice and of course the alexa

01:16

lf

01:18

and lf mini aside from that any other

01:20

sensor that you're using you could

01:21

really use these same principles

01:23

so what are we talking about right now

01:25

so we're talking about cinematic look

01:26

versus

01:27

you know a more videoish look that you

01:29

would get if you kind of just

01:31

use the wrong settings on the digital

01:33

camera system so what do you have to get

01:35

or how do you achieve a cinematic look

01:37

well there's a few things that you can

01:39

do in the camera and lens

01:40

combinations and the settings to kind of

01:42

help you out to really get there

01:44

so first of all you want to get shallow

01:46

depth of field and you get this with a

01:48

combination

01:49

of you know using uh the camera settings

01:51

a certain way in terms of the iso and

01:54

then using your lens

01:55

with a t-stop or an f-stop that's more

01:57

open

01:58

or closer to you know an f one four

02:02

f-one five two eight or something like

02:04

that instead of using

02:06

f-16 11 which is really closed down

02:09

uh you can change the look that you have

02:12

by

02:12

filming a wide contrast range and then

02:15

outputting a low contrast image

02:18

instead of a high contrast image this

02:20

will really help you get more of a

02:21

cinematic look and then of course

02:23

motion blur so this is especially

02:25

important when your image is in motion

02:27

you want to have the correct motion blur

02:30

that and that gives you the right look

02:32

you know for what you're trying to

02:33

achieve so let's break each section down

02:35

one by one

02:36

and go through it first of all we have

02:38

depth of field

02:40

the idea of the shallow depth of field

02:42

that you see in cinema

02:43

is to draw your eye as a viewer and

02:47

allow you to focus on what the

02:49

storyteller is trying to get you to

02:51

focus on

02:52

so that's a really important part of

02:54

using the shallow depth of field

02:56

so for example in these two examples you

02:58

see a more videoish look

03:00

on the left with the deep uh depth of

03:03

field

03:03

you know the deep focus and then a more

03:05

cinematic look with the shallow depth of

03:07

field with the deep

03:08

focus you know your eyes go everywhere

03:10

you start to see details

03:11

in the cityscape in the trees and the

03:14

flowers

03:14

and the building and you know it's a

03:17

good idea because

03:19

you're doing a yoga video here so you

03:20

really want to see all the different

03:22

positions and the yoga teacher wherever

03:25

they are you don't want it to be out of

03:26

focus

03:27

um so it makes sense to have a deep

03:29

focus but the resulting image of course

03:31

is more video like and less cinematic

03:33

whereas on the right

03:34

you all really have a very shallow depth

03:36

of field and the shallow depth of field

03:38

really tells a story because

03:39

it focuses on the two main characters

03:42

that are most important right there in

03:43

the middle

03:44

the foreground's out of focus the

03:45

background's out of focus there's a nice

03:47

bouquet

03:48

um you know nice imagery going on here

03:50

nice colors but really

03:51

the focus is what's drawing you you know

03:54

being so shallow

03:55

to look at the characters really

03:56

concentrate on what they're doing next

03:58

and that's really important in

03:59

storytelling another example is

04:01

you see right here on the left a deep

04:04

focus you know you see this

04:05

garbage in front of a garage there's a

04:08

lot of detail there there's a lot of

04:09

things to see

04:10

a lot of things distract you this can't

04:12

be a quick shot

04:13

you know in a movie because there would

04:14

be too much stuff going on

04:16

and just too much information whereas

04:19

the picture on the right of the security

04:21

guard with the

04:21

shallow depth of field in the background

04:23

really helps you concentrate you

04:25

understand that the guard is

04:26

at some crosswalk and it's a urban

04:29

landscape

04:30

you know probably a nice area to go

04:32

shopping it looks like in the background

04:33

there's some

04:34

shops and people there but but it really

04:36

is a story about the security guard

04:38

so therefore the concentration is there

04:41

so let's show you this in motion

04:43

this is an example actually from a short

04:45

film called morpho

04:46

one of our ambassadors helped us with

04:48

this so you can see here the same

04:50

cityscape

04:51

where right now you see a deep focus

04:54

can now be transformed into this sci-fi

04:57

looking shot

04:58

and very cinematic with the very shallow

05:01

depth of field

05:02

so again it's the same location same

05:04

place

05:05

and you're seeing a big difference in

05:07

how the locations portrayed

05:09

based on the shallow depth of field and

05:11

the camera work and where the focus lies

05:13

of course it's very important to you

05:15

know have good focus

05:17

and have a good focus puller that's

05:19

really paying attention because you want

05:20

to keep the focus

05:21

even though the the character in this

05:24

example is closer and further away from

05:26

the camera at different points

05:28

so another example of depth of field is

05:31

right here this is a documentary called

05:32

through the thick

05:33

but as you can see there's still a

05:37

deeper depth of field but still pretty

05:38

shallow so the foreground objects are

05:40

out of focus

05:41

the far background is out of focus as

05:43

well but in the middle there's quite a

05:45

bit of focus now it's not to say that

05:47

you know you need to have a shallow

05:48

depth of field at f28 or f2 or f14

05:52

you know you're gonna get very shallow

05:54

there here you can still get a shallow

05:56

depth of field look

05:57

but it's probably closed down to more

05:58

like a five six or an eight

06:01

using an nd filter um outdoors into

06:03

bright sunlight

06:04

but you really get a nice look over here

06:07

even though it's a doc style shoot

06:09

it's very much a cinematic shot so in

06:12

this last example you can see

06:14

pulling focus how that changes the focus

06:17

of what you're supposed to look at so

06:19

now you're using this

06:21

focus creatively the shallow depth of

06:23

field to go from a foreground object to

06:25

the background object

06:26

to show you know the masks in the

06:28

foreground are actually being made by

06:29

the person in the background

06:31

so this is a very good example of how

06:34

shallow depth of field because that can

06:35

then be used with a focus pool

06:37

so just to go over it one more time for

06:40

shallow depth of field

06:41

open the iris of your lens uh adjust the

06:44

iso as necessary as needed

06:46

use nd filters that needed to lower the

06:48

intensity of light so you're not dealing

06:49

with a lot of bright

06:51

and having to you know close down your

06:53

iso a lot if it doesn't work for your

06:55

camera system

06:56

a lot of camera systems have preferred

06:58

iso settings

06:59

like 500 in the sony venice 800 and the

07:02

alexa

07:03

where they have a nice range you know

07:05

above and below

07:06

um that iso that gives them a knife

07:09

gives you a nice range for

07:10

for exposure so sometimes you have to

07:12

use well a lot of times you have to use

07:14

nd filters to really

07:15

get you to the middle ground where you

07:17

need it so keep that in mind

07:19

and of course the more shallow depth of

07:21

field the more critical focus is going

07:22

to be

07:23

so the next part of creating a cinematic

07:27

image

07:27

is low contrast so low contrast is

07:30

another way which

07:31

involves not just you know shooting but

07:33

also processing on the back end

07:35

so you need a combination of the two for

07:38

example in the still

07:39

image you can take like a raw image in

07:41

your in your

07:42

photography camera still image and then

07:44

process it so that you have a pretty

07:46

good dynamic range

07:47

that you're portraying that dynamic

07:49

range will give you a lot of information

07:51

the blacks and the grays

07:53

which then creates a more low contrast

07:56

image instead of a high contrast image

07:58

now you have to have a good lens too so

08:02

the lens has to give you a lot of

08:03

information here we see an example

08:05

of a high contrast and a low contrast in

08:08

a similar situation

08:09

you can tell that already just by

08:11

looking at this low contrast image on

08:13

the right side

08:14

it looks more cinematic you know being

08:16

able to see

08:17

different tones in the skin um you know

08:20

different shades

08:21

in the shirt and also in in the

08:23

background

08:24

compared to the image on the left which

08:26

looks very commercial and very poppy

08:28

but at the same time not very cinematic

08:30

it's the really the low contrast that

08:32

makes the big difference here

08:34

we take a look at the two next to each

08:35

other that really shows you how

08:37

just using a low contrast look can

08:39

really give you a lot of information

08:41

that is softer and is nice to look at

08:44

and kind of

08:45

makes the image look really pretty at

08:46

the same time giving you enough

08:48

information to help tell the story

08:50

here's another example of the same

08:52

subject in this case

08:54

you know a woman sitting in a lighting

08:56

studio or photography studio

08:58

a high contrast image and a low contrast

09:00

image the low contrast image just makes

09:02

your skin look softer

09:03

gives you more information or more you

09:06

know colors to kind of play with

09:08

um it is more muted this photograph on

09:11

the right side

09:12

and then the left side so there's some

09:13

artistic choices made here

09:15

in terms of coloring you know blue in

09:17

the shadows

09:18

putting some blue colors in the shadows

09:20

things like this are nice tricks

09:22

in post-production to really give you a

09:25

signature cinematic look because

09:27

you really don't want to look like

09:28

everybody else all the time sometimes

09:30

you really want to look different

09:31

and here's how you can do it by playing

09:34

with the contrast but also the colors

09:35

that you use

09:36

in the darks and in the skin tones again

09:40

a low contrast image versus a high

09:41

contrast image

09:44

just the look that you're getting in the

09:46

low contrast image

09:48

automatically just takes it to another

09:50

level in terms of a cinematic look

09:52

um you know when you want to do this in

09:55

camera you got to record

09:56

with a flatter gamma curve now this is

09:58

sometimes difficult in dslrs but a lot

10:00

of

10:00

dslrs are also letting you record like

10:03

in the a7 camera the mirrorless system

10:05

from sony

10:06

you can actually use uh you know a

10:09

s-log type of setting so you can get

10:12

this kind of flatter gamma curve

10:14

a log c and alexa red has its own

10:18

gamma curve built in and these gamma

10:20

curves really let you have more

10:22

information now

10:23

of course it can be represented

10:24

correctly maybe on some on monitors

10:27

unless you have an hdr monitor you can't

10:28

really see a lot of these exposure

10:30

levels but they're there just like

10:32

in raw photography and still photography

10:34

your exposure level can change quite a

10:36

bit

10:36

just like in raw photography still

10:39

photography

10:40

your exposure level can change quite a

10:41

bit because your sensor is capturing a

10:43

lot of information

10:44

same thing with cinema digital cinema if

10:46

you shoot with a

10:48

flatter curve a gamma curve that allows

10:50

you to see more information you can

10:52

record it

10:52

and then creatively use it later you

10:54

also want to use lenses that have great

10:56

neutral light balance that

10:58

just like this lens that we're using

10:59

here which is a milvis lens from zeiss

11:02

you want to be able to see lots of

11:04

different levels of exposure at the same

11:06

time

11:06

a good dynamic range and a very very

11:08

good piece of glass that has

11:10

great anti-reflective coatings and good

11:12

color balance will actually give that to

11:13

you

11:14

so you have that information these kinds

11:16

of lenses have great

11:17

mtf curve basically the performance of

11:19

the lens from center to edge is very

11:21

good

11:22

it gives you good light transmission and

11:24

really accurate colors

11:25

and great skin tones and that's really

11:27

important basis to start from

11:29

to try to create these looks and of

11:30

course when you're in post that's when

11:32

you do a lot of these

11:33

adjustments the next step that you want

11:35

to take when you're trying to get a more

11:37

cinematic image

11:38

and this is really important for motion

11:40

is motion blur you want to get the right

11:42

type of motion blur

11:43

you don't want a lot of information that

11:46

again

11:46

if it's too sharp and there's too much

11:48

information on screen there's too much

11:50

for people to pay attention to

11:52

when you have motion blur you add it

11:53

correctly you're making sure that

11:56

your audience focuses on the subject

11:58

matter and what's important

11:59

and that's really the key to motion blur

12:02

is to

12:02

make you again focus on the action the

12:05

person the object

12:07

you know the talent instead of focusing

12:09

on everything else

12:10

so again if you have high shutter speed

12:13

yes you can get very sharp

12:14

clean images um that really are like you

12:17

know

12:18

holding something in in time and and

12:20

timeless but at the same time

12:22

for motion it might not give you exactly

12:24

what you want you have to

12:26

understand where to start from first to

12:28

kind of break the rules and then play

12:29

with it so

12:30

on the right side we see here with the

12:32

low shutter speed

12:33

large shutter angle you know you're

12:35

getting the motion blur so you're

12:37

gonna see the water coming up with the

12:40

feet it's gonna look really interesting

12:41

on the left with the high shutter speed

12:43

smaller shutter angle

12:44

you get a lot of information but but it

12:46

might be too much you're getting a lot

12:48

of depth

12:49

and you're getting a lot of information

12:50

that might overload you and not

12:52

allow you to look where you really need

12:54

to um in this situation

12:56

same with these examples here the one on

12:58

the left it's really interesting

13:00

great for a fight scene uh but not

13:03

necessarily

13:04

great for when you're trying to tell the

13:06

story of somebody and trying to follow

13:07

them

13:08

on the right even though you can't

13:10

really see what's going on around

13:12

the driver this is a very cinematic you

13:14

know action-packed type of shot

13:16

because you're really focused on you

13:19

know the speed lines and everything else

13:20

making everything look super fast and

13:23

energetic you know this image is a still

13:24

image

13:25

but it still looks like it has a lot of

13:26

energy it's making you feel like it's

13:28

going forward

13:30

well just imagine in motion it's going

13:31

to do more of that so

13:33

creatively you have to know where to set

13:35

your shutter angles and shutter speeds

13:38

to get what you want so let's take a

13:40

look at this one example here

13:42

from all blood runs red which is a film

13:45

that was

13:45

uh helped in part by zeiss and you could

13:48

actually see

13:49

in this boxing sequence the shallow

13:52

depth of field mixed with the

13:53

motion blur really makes you want to

13:56

concentrate and pay attention to what

13:58

the boxer is going through

14:00

you're trying to keep up with the boxer

14:02

you're trying to understand

14:03

the moves and kind of like what his

14:05

technique is

14:06

and that's part of it's because it is

14:08

out of focus a little bit here and there

14:10

and there it is searching but at the

14:11

same time you know the motion blur

14:13

helps you really feel the energy because

14:16

the boxer looks like

14:17

he's moving really really fast and

14:18

another example if you

14:20

are doing slow-mo then you're going to

14:22

adjust your shutter you can't just have

14:24

180 degree shutter

14:25

for example in this case with high speed

14:28

recording like on a phantom you're going

14:30

to have to have a different shutter

14:31

angle altogether

14:33

that way you capture the motion

14:35

correctly and still get a little bit of

14:38

motion blur so it looks energetic it

14:39

looks like it's moving forward

14:41

it doesn't look like the object's very

14:42

stilted it looks very smooth

14:45

okay so how do you do that well this is

14:48

what you do first you figure out what is

14:49

a 180 degree shutter

14:51

180 degree shutter if you're using

14:53

shutter speed instead of shutter angles

14:55

is one over two times fps so

14:58

at 24 frames a second 180 degree shutter

15:01

would be

15:02

a shutter speed of 1 48th okay that

15:05

means

15:06

at that point you get pretty decent

15:08

motion blur

15:09

um it looks very similar to what film

15:12

was giving you back in the day

15:14

because 180 degree angle would be about

15:16

150

15:17

of shutter speed but if you want to play

15:20

with it

15:20

you could do two different things you

15:22

could make a smaller angle for sharper

15:24

edges and

15:25

more energetic type of look uh and of

15:27

course this will give you much more

15:29

detail

15:30

and you can do a lot larger shutter

15:32

angle for more motion blur

15:34

so let's calculate a smaller shutter

15:35

angle so if you're doing a 90 degree

15:37

shutter angle instead

15:38

then you're going to have to do

15:41

something with your shutter speed

15:42

because now

15:43

you know your shutter is going to change

15:45

instead of 180 degrees

15:47

if you go to 90 your shutter speed is

15:48

going to be much faster

15:50

so it's going to be twice of 148 so it's

15:53

going to be about 1 100 of a second and

15:55

at that point you're going to have to

15:56

let more light in

15:57

because you've shrank the shutter angle

16:00

so therefore now you need more light to

16:01

expose

16:02

so let's go the other way if you're

16:03

doing a larger angle let's say if you go

16:05

from 180 degrees to 270 degrees you're

16:08

going to get more motion blur

16:09

so you're going to get even more blur

16:11

more blur lines but maybe you're doing a

16:13

dream sequence it makes a lot of sense

16:15

so in this case you know you're going to

16:17

have to lower your shutter speed so

16:19

maybe your shutter speed

16:20

would go down to 1 125th or something

16:24

like that

16:24

to give you that larger angle that'll

16:27

basically slow down

16:30

how things are recorded in the digital

16:31

sensor to emulate

16:33

what is happening on a film's uh film

16:35

play

16:36

so this is the kind of the creative ways

16:38

you can do it now let's say you're

16:39

shooting high speed

16:40

well this changes everything right so if

16:42

you're shooting if at

16:43

twice the speed of 24 frames a second 48

16:46

frames a second

16:47

then your shutter speed is going to be

16:48

one over two times 48

16:50

one one hundredth of a second once again

16:52

you're not in a creative way but trying

16:54

to maintain the 180 degree angle

16:56

this is what you're gonna have to do if

16:57

you go for high speed shots

16:59

okay so those are the things that we say

17:02

will help you create a cinematic look

17:04

those three things the shallow depth of

17:06

field

17:06

the low contrast and the motion blur so

17:09

in conclusion

17:10

how do you achieve a cinematic look well

17:12

we talked about three different things

17:13

that you could look out for

17:14

shallow depth of field low contrast and

17:17

motion blur

17:18

these are the things you can play with

17:20

to try to get that cinematic look

17:22

from any kind of camera system so go out

17:24

pick up a camera system

17:26

whatever you have nearby i know you're

17:28

shutting at home or not working

17:30

working from home right now but now is

17:32

your chance to pick up a camera

17:33

learn some new techniques and play with

17:35

it and then respond to us

17:37

and see what kind of topics we should

17:39

cover for the next round

17:40

so i want to thank our our um supporters

17:43

and of course thank uh unsplash and

17:46

pixabay because that's where we found a

17:48

lot of these photographs

17:50

and of course all of our zeiss

17:51

contributors to our youtube and vimeo

17:53

channels

17:54

that are really contributing amazing

17:56

content that we were able to use as

17:57

examples here

17:58

you can see all of this at the zeit

18:00

cinematography page on youtube

18:02

so thank you very much you have a great

18:05

evening

18:06

and please let us know what kind of

18:08

topics you want to talk about

18:10

and we'll cover them in the next vlogs

18:12

episode

18:13

[Music]

00:02

welcome please

00:04

Natasha Li Annette she has worked on

00:07

wait for it

00:08

almost 80 feature films but when did you

00:12

know that you wanted to be a colorist so

00:16

when I studied film I studied film at

00:20

Brown University in Rhode Island and I

00:22

did film theory I didn't even know that

00:24

a colorist existed we were making

00:27

non-narrative very experimental films

00:29

and we would send at the time we were

00:32

using film acquisitions we were using

00:34

film cameras and we would send the film

00:36

to be processed in New York and it would

00:38

come back on a tape and we didn't know

00:40

how that happened

00:41

so it was sort of this mystery to me and

00:43

then I made my thesis film in the Czech

00:46

Republic and I studied Czech and so when

00:48

I finished with school I moved to the

00:51

Czech Republic and I threw sort of a

00:55

series of Lucky accidents I became a

00:58

post production supervisor and so I had

01:01

to learn about color correction really

01:02

really fast ironically the first time

01:06

that I ever saw it sort of happened I

01:08

thought I never want to be in this color

01:10

suite again because the presentation

01:13

that I saw of color correction just

01:14

seems so uninspired and sort of boring

01:17

and then I met a colorist who was the

01:20

antithesis of that she was based in

01:22

Munich and and I watched her work and I

01:25

thought this is what I've always wanted

01:26

to me you know I thought about editing

01:29

but when I watched her I thought this is

01:31

my sensibility this is my strength is

01:33

you know really understanding colors and

01:36

lending them to a story and using color

01:38

to tell you know basically the story the

01:40

emotion of the story and so that's where

01:44

I thought I would be strongest and so I

01:45

did an apprenticeship with this colorist

01:48

biggy clear in Munich and and then it

01:52

grew from there at the time when I

01:54

started it was not being used for

01:55

feature films so in my mind I was going

01:58

to be working only on commercials and

01:59

music videos which I was perfectly happy

02:01

to do and then right within the first

02:04

year it was introduced for feature films

02:06

and that was thrilling and so it just

02:09

sort of took off from there

02:12

when we're lucky we get to start right

02:14

at the beginning with the nut creation

02:18

and help to shape or you know support

02:22

the cinematographer and creating the

02:26

look from the beginning basically with a

02:28

lot and and then sometimes colorist will

02:33

be dailies colorist and so they're doing

02:35

the CDLs the color decision list for the

02:40

first step in the color correction and

02:41

helping to establish the look at a film

02:44

you come in you're very very lucky

02:45

you've had an amazing assistant who set

02:47

up the room for you who's calibrated the

02:49

room who's made sure that your projector

02:51

is perfect in terms of the light level

02:54

and the color balance of the projector

02:56

and you have your files and you just

02:59

start if you're right on the first day

03:00

of a project that means that you're

03:01

going to be setting looks you set

03:03

masters so you try to pick you know a

03:05

few shots that are representative for

03:07

every single scene and and then after

03:11

that usually you have the director and

03:12

the cinematographer there with you as

03:14

you're establishing a look and then

03:16

normally you're sort of given some time

03:18

by yourself to brush in those looks and

03:21

everybody looks at it once you're done

03:23

and then you will start to really

03:25

fine-tune it and you know basically

03:28

depending on the budget of the film you

03:31

know it sort of determines how in-depth

03:33

you'll you'll get in the fine-tuning a

03:35

normal day is you know anywhere from

03:38

eight hours to much much more it just

03:41

depends on you know the project

03:44

sometimes it'll happen that you're on

03:46

one project until 6 p.m. and then you

03:48

know somebody another client needs you

03:50

to look at their files at night so

03:51

you'll work on that but it honestly it

03:54

never feels like a hardship because it's

03:56

just it's such beautiful work so I don't

04:00

know I always just feel very lucky how

04:02

many movies are you working on at the

04:04

same time these last few months have

04:07

just been working on one but you can you

04:10

know I've had moments where I think I've

04:12

been on two to three projects

04:14

simultaneously but that's that's rare I

04:16

mean we're very blessed at a film that

04:18

they really try to work with the

04:20

schedules to make it that we can just

04:22

focus all of our attention on the

04:24

project that we're all

04:25

do you have any advice for anybody in

04:28

the room who may want to be a colorist I

04:30

think in terms of wanting to be a

04:32

colorist watch as many films as you

04:35

possibly can and pay attention to the

04:38

ones that really speak to you color wise

04:40

really try to develop your color acuity

04:43

and your color awareness and I think

04:47

that you know in terms of color

04:49

correction work it's incredibly

04:50

important because you might have a

04:53

client who's asking you to create a very

04:55

surreal world that doesn't necessarily

04:56

reflect the world that we're in or a

04:58

world that feels incredibly true and

05:01

honest and you have to take your color

05:03

awareness and make sure that you're

05:05

telling the story that they're asking

05:07

you to tell as best as you possibly can

05:09

also when you're watching films you'll

05:11

become aware you know of maybe which

05:15

colors work you really enjoy which

05:17

cinematographers work you really love

05:18

and I think that that can kind of help

05:21

take you in a path of you know which

05:23

color correction house you'd like to go

05:25

to to do an apprenticeship maybe and

05:27

just kind of find your path from there I

05:31

really think that that's more important

05:34

than you know just diving into the

05:37

technical the technical you will get

05:39

into completely once you're at that post

05:41

house every on every single film I

05:43

learned something I've never felt like

05:46

there wasn't a film where I finished it

05:49

and felt like oh well you know I knew

05:51

everything already when I started every

05:53

single phone maker and with every film

05:56

has something to teach me um and I feel

05:58

like I just get better and better with

06:00

every single project what advice can you

06:04

give to them for them when they are in

06:08

that room to help you help them

06:10

references okay not provide enough

06:14

references let's just say you say the

06:16

color of magenta you know too many

06:18

people that can mean many different

06:20

things and in order to use the time as

06:22

efficiently as you possibly can if you

06:24

have a reference that says this is

06:26

exactly the color that I'm thinking of

06:28

then it really saves so much time in the

06:31

color correction room if you have films

06:33

that you want to reference you know and

06:35

just bring in stills that's really going

06:36

to help save time as well because again

06:38

it's

06:39

it's an interpretation that happens in

06:41

the room and you want to make sure that

06:42

that colorist nails exactly what you

06:45

have as your vision

06:49

honestly I would just cold call a post

06:53

house and just you know try to you know

06:55

say who's the person who's in charge of

06:57

the assistance and hiring and just try

07:00

to get through to that person send

07:02

emails you know if you don't hear the

07:04

first time just keep trying because

07:06

chances are there will be an opening and

07:08

you know it's just a matter of

07:10

persistence

07:15

don't get discouraged you know every

07:18

time one door closes chances are another

07:21

one is going to open so just don't don't

07:24

take that

07:25

door closing as a sign that you

07:26

shouldn't keep trying if that's where

07:28

your heart is

07:29

[Applause]

00:07

diverse women are the sleeping giant in

00:10

America

00:12

becoming self-made is the ticking clock

00:15

for women it's not if but when I believe

00:20

this is an incredible time to be

00:22

entrepreneur the new goal is to become

00:25

self-made let me show you how I want to

00:30

thank coke because I wrote this book

00:32

I've been all over the country teaching

00:34

women and men how to become self-made

00:37

it's an initiative they have called 5 by

00:39

20 to empower 5 million women by the

00:42

year 2020 in entrepreneurship and we're

00:44

almost at that number I went to work for

00:48

CBS a couple of years later as a

00:50

reporter and I went around the country

00:52

interviewing people and one of those

00:54

people that I interviewed was a man

00:56

named Norman Lear who you may know a

00:58

very legendary producer and he and his

01:01

partner had just bought the first

01:04

Spanish TV station in America and they

01:07

offered me a job to basically go work

01:09

for them I was like the only lucky you

01:11

know they met and at the time I was very

01:14

much like are you kidding me I'm gonna

01:15

be a network correspondent at CBS and

01:18

the two of them said to me he and his

01:20

partners it to me you're latina gee I go

01:23

don't you want to work for a Latino

01:25

thing and I go no it's kind of that

01:26

feels yucky to me and they said don't

01:29

you know that the Latino market is a

01:31

multi-billion dollar market and you're

01:33

gonna be employee one of a huge content

01:37

business and when they said that to me I

01:39

was like I think I should go work for

01:41

these guys I'm gonna bet on people

01:43

versus CBS or vs. whatever and I think

01:47

you guys have to think about that

01:48

because people are the ones that take

01:51

you to the next place and I think that

01:53

was a single best decision of my life

01:55

imagine if today you had been employee

01:57

one of Google or Netflix or Amazon now I

02:02

worked there for a number of years and

02:04

then they sold it before it became

02:06

Telemundo they sold it and I was

02:09

distraught and I said to them how could

02:10

you guys do this to me how could you

02:12

sell this and not tell me and they're

02:14

like young lady these are our chips go

02:17

get your own chips and so I decided I'm

02:21

gonna go start my own company it's going

02:23

to be a production company

02:25

to make content I knocked on every door

02:27

in Hollywood I went to see every company

02:29

and for four years you guys I didn't

02:32

make a penny I didn't sell one show

02:35

nothing happened and I didn't give up

02:39

because when I had been with Norman Lear

02:40

and Jerry Parenti oh the times I had

02:43

spent with him they said when I when we

02:44

were your age we started a business

02:46

we made no money for ten years and then

02:49

it hit big and so I thought well I'm

02:51

only on year four but my parents were

02:55

losing it but if I go get a job you're

02:58

losing your looks

02:59

get with it you know do something and

03:00

I'm like oh my god oh my god oh my god

03:02

and in the middle of all that one of the

03:05

companies I had hit up was HBO and the

03:08

president of HBO at that time calls me

03:10

up one day and says listen we really

03:12

don't have any shows for you to produce

03:14

and you have no real experience but we

03:17

want to launch HBO in Latin America can

03:20

you help us in the trajectory of your

03:23

artsy-fartsy career things will show up

03:26

you say no to nothing you don't know

03:28

where that journey is gonna take you I

03:31

helped them I went to Latin America

03:33

because I spoke Spanish nobody at HBO at

03:35

that time spoke Spanish I went to Latin

03:38

America I helped them launch HBO and as

03:41

a result they kind of fell in love with

03:42

me then I get a call from a guy I didn't

03:45

know who he was he said come and see me

03:47

in California it was Rupert Murdoch he

03:49

was getting ready to buy Fox and he goes

03:51

I want to launch six channels in Latin

03:53

America and I said to him I want to make

03:55

shows can you give me a deal to make

03:57

shows and he's like young lady

04:00

distribution comes before content when

04:03

you're the queen of distribution you'll

04:05

be the queen of content I say all this

04:07

because there's a parallel to right now

04:09

with Netflix and Disney and all the

04:12

streamers distribution always comes

04:15

before content the other thing nobody

04:17

tells you is how much does it take to

04:19

make movies and TV shows a lot if you if

04:22

people don't feel confident that you can

04:23

manage their money they're not just

04:25

gonna hand you the money so all those

04:28

other things that I did gave me the

04:30

experience to be able to manage money

04:33

this is not a world that chooses you if

04:37

you don't choose yourself if

04:39

you guys didn't apply you would not be

04:40

here right this is the most competitive

04:43

industry maybe this in tech now if you

04:47

don't choose yourself if you don't

04:49

declare yourself if you don't love

04:51

yourself enough to think that you

04:53

deserve to get the thing you're nobody's

04:55

gonna hand it to you on a silver platter

04:57

because sometimes it's daunting

04:59

sometimes you feel like I can't compete

05:01

with those people there's so much better

05:03

than me

05:03

you better fake it and I got you can and

05:05

declare yourself because you're not

05:08

gonna get there if you don't choose

05:10

yourself it's your voice so think of it

05:12

when you hear somebody sing a cover and

05:15

they sound just like the singer and

05:17

that's how they begin to practice but

05:19

eventually you've got to find your own

05:21

voice there is no true empowerment until

05:25

you have your own money let me tell you

05:27

something you guys think oh I'm gonna

05:29

make this little movie I'm in love with

05:31

it blah blah blah and somebody gives you

05:33

the money to make it guess what it's not

05:34

your movie somebody gave you the money

05:37

and if they tell you you have to change

05:39

something you have to change it the only

05:42

way you get to make your own art is if

05:45

you make a lot of money or make money at

05:47

something else and make your own thing

05:49

and all of you have the ability in this

05:52

age to make your own content on so many

05:55

platforms with your own money direct to

05:58

your customer don't just think your art

06:00

is gonna empower you because that's like

06:03

woo woo thinking it's not true it's not

06:06

real self-made is a mindset that you

06:09

have to cultivate and the mindset is

06:12

that you live in two parallel tracks

06:14

mission and money and so that means that

06:19

you never are ashamed of whatever you

06:21

have to do to make money while you're

06:22

doing your mission and it also means

06:25

that money comes before mission and I

06:28

know that sounds like the opposite of

06:30

what everybody tells you but the truth

06:32

is that if you are living hand-to-mouth

06:35

you're gonna do things that you're

06:37

ashamed of you're gonna do things that

06:39

you're not proud of so never be ashamed

06:41

to make money so you can do the right

06:43

things in your mission one of my boss is

06:46

it to me young lady when you make money

06:48

you better make money while you sleep

06:51

when I go is he's speaking in a foreign

06:52

language I

06:52

no idea what he's saying but he was

06:54

telling me the biggest truth that no one

06:57

tells you the money you make in this

06:59

country and the money you save if you

07:01

don't invest it you're not gonna make it

07:03

to the end of your life I don't care if

07:05

you're Steven Spielberg or you're a

07:06

plumber because that the business of

07:09

being an actor doesn't always make it to

07:11

the end of your life you have to save

07:14

money you have to invest that money that

07:17

means diversify how do we become

07:19

self-made the number one thing is we

07:22

have to change our mindset from instant

07:24

gratification to goal orientation go to

07:26

the end of your life and start

07:29

visualizing who are the people that I

07:31

want to grow up to be it's not about

07:33

just being rich or successful or famous

07:35

it's rich in every way cherry-pick the

07:39

people that you see that are 50 what is

07:42

good a good version look like and what

07:44

does a bad version look like so you have

07:46

a clear picture because life is about

07:48

reverse engineering when you see success

07:51

copy it ask them read about them maybe

07:54

it's a famous person but you better

07:56

start visualizing the life you have

07:58

because people that don't visualize

07:59

exactly what they want don't get it if

08:03

you don't write things down if you don't

08:06

ask yourself what do I really want

08:07

sometimes we're afraid to say it because

08:09

we're like Oh what if I jinx it no write

08:12

it down say it and if you don't think

08:15

big you're not gonna get too big

08:16

you're not gonna sacrifice what you need

08:18

to sacrifice to get too big I wish

08:21

somebody had told me that to make it in

08:24

your career and in your life you have to

08:26

not just deal with fear and failure you

08:29

have to make fear and failure your best

08:30

friend do you know how many times I have

08:32

failed my failure real would be three

08:35

times as long and we be crying the whole

08:36

night everyone is afraid all the time

08:39

and when I'm afraid I just go do it

08:43

anyway

08:44

do it anyway do it anyway those of us

08:46

that come from you know minority

08:49

cultures we're told and I don't do that

08:51

hi it's that it's our parents baggage

08:54

and we think that when fear shows up

08:57

we're supposed to not do it know when

08:59

fear shows up you must do it what's the

09:02

worst thing that's gonna happen you're

09:04

gonna fail guess what

09:06

your personal life you will fail in your

09:08

business life you will fail and around

09:11

the corner from many failures is your

09:14

greatest success and the only people

09:16

they get to that success are people that

09:19

stick to it I think that to be to have a

09:22

great life you're gonna eventually see

09:24

that you become congruent personally and

09:26

professionally by connecting the dots of

09:29

all the things that are meaningful to

09:31

you and that is the journey you are on

09:33

it's gonna take you a lifetime but

09:35

that's what it is

09:36

it's not if but when I hope I hope you

09:38

really heard that so my favorite word in

09:40

Spanish is a long day because that means

09:43

like I like there like move your butts

09:48

nothing is coming to you on a silver

09:51

platter nor should it

09:53

we cannot be victimized we have to be

09:55

victors we have to go get it to go after

09:59

opportunities you have to apply to

10:01

everything and you cannot let one or two

10:04

or twenty or fifty disappointments get

10:06

you now you have to visualize it you

10:09

have to declare it and you have to go

10:11

get it so I say to all of you adelante

10:20

you

04:33

when we're telling narratives because we

04:34

can shoot slow moving things like clouds

04:36

or the tide going in and out or you get

04:39

in foliage moving and you don't not see

04:41

that to the naked eye because it's such

04:42

slow moving movement but over a long

04:44

period of time and then when we compress

04:46

it with time-lapse

04:47

you can see that and it's a very good

04:49

narrative tool now Before we jump right

04:51

into time-lapse I wanted to show you

04:53

guys my desktop real quick and give a

04:55

quick shout out to the solitaire series

04:57

that we're watching and if you did want

04:58

to see any of those previous eight

05:00

episodes that you can go go ahead and

05:02

navigate right back here and see any of

05:04

the solitaire series that both Jonathan

05:05

pets and I previously had done I did

05:08

also want to give a personal shout-out

05:09

to mark a Yeager good close friend and

05:11

fellow red monstro owner mark is a

05:14

wealth of knowledge on time-lapse and

05:16

you can see him in the chat and he'll be

05:17

answering some questions as well you'll

05:19

also be seeing a lot of his work and

05:21

examples that we're going to be seeing

05:23

today now before we get right into it I

05:25

want to show you a time-lapse first from

05:28

mark and I want to be real clear that

05:29

these first two time lapses were not

05:31

taken with the red they were taken with

05:33

your traditional DSLR camera I will say

05:35

for the most part that's how most time

05:37

lapses are taken with a still camera and

05:39

just keep in mind that with your still

05:41

camera marks going out with his slider

05:43

capturing 50 megabyte Ross Stills and he

05:46

might do two to three thousand of those

05:48

stills over the course of a few hours

05:50

bring them back into a photo editing

05:53

program where they help color correct

05:54

those 50 megabyte stills and each one of

05:57

those 50 megabyte stills might be 250

05:59

megabytes with each individual frame

06:01

he'll then bring that into a program

06:03

like LR time-lapse which will stitch

06:05

together that and it's not uncommon that

06:08

his 10 or 15 gigs that he started out

06:09

with of just raw stills might be a total

06:12

working file that might be 75 to 100

06:14

gigs when you finally go through all of

06:16

that process now I'm gonna go ahead and

06:18

show you this first example here and

06:20

notice that once again you can see that

06:22

there's some movement in here you can

06:24

see that the clouds and the compression

06:25

of time and I just want to be clear here

06:27

that these original time lapses were not

06:29

captured on a red and these were all

06:30

captured before all these parks went on

06:32

lockdown but the one key point that I

06:34

want to point out here is that this was

06:36

something that was taken over several

06:38

several hours here and now you can see

06:40

that compression of time you can see the

06:42

clouds moving the foliage going in the

06:44

wind and once again this is something

06:46

that was captured on a still camera

06:47

maybe 10 to 15 gigs of original source

06:50

files by the time you color correct and

06:52

bring it into a program like LR

06:54

time-lapse it's gonna grow exponentially

06:56

in size at the end of the day you'll

06:58

have to take that continuous sequence or

07:00

the sequence you get out of there and

07:01

reintroduce it back into your narrative

07:04

sequence or your NLE that you're working

07:05

with and that's where you kind of have a

07:07

bait and swap often times where your

07:09

stills are gonna have to color match

07:10

back with your with your recorded

07:12

narrative footage now if I go ahead and

07:14

kick it back to my camera in full I

07:16

wanted to thank Mark for those first

07:18

original clips here and if I go ahead

07:19

and navigate back to my desktop here

07:21

what you're going to see is those my all

07:24

of those four clips that we saw at the

07:26

beginning of the sequence these were all

07:28

RAW files that were taken with my Gemini

07:30

camera and a little bit of backstory I

07:32

didn't have a slider if you notice the

07:34

clip actually doesn't move

07:36

I just was able to use that extra

07:37

resolution to do a little pose oom and

07:39

to do a little representation of a

07:41

slider or a punch in or a pan the other

07:44

nice thing about this is all of these

07:46

clips are still raw and if I did want to

07:48

see that all I have to do is come back

07:50

here into red cine X and you can clearly

07:52

see that all four of these files are

07:53

still raw and I can very easily take

07:55

them back to their original state by

07:56

going apply right here so that's a very

07:59

very quick process on color correcting

08:02

or doing my first light here in red cine

08:03

X going right over here into premiere

08:06

dropping those into my sequence and

08:08

really I have a nice compressed sequence

08:10

of time here and I'm not having to do a

08:12

baton swap I'm not having to work with

08:14

multiple cameras and I still have that

08:16

consistent look and feel that we were

08:18

going for at the beginning of my

08:20

narrative piece now whenever we're

08:22

talking about time lapse there's two

08:24

real four main parameters that we need

08:26

to know how to control its shutter and

08:28

interval shutter we learned in the last

08:30

motion distills solitary series that we

08:33

did with shutter was what allowed us to

08:34

essentially either stop motion or

08:36

introduce motion blur if we wanted to

08:38

have that content that look if if most

08:41

people don't realize this but if you

08:43

pause your TV or watch a movie and pause

08:45

it you will see that same motion blur

08:47

our eyes in our brain are so used to

08:49

seeing that blur that when you start to

08:51

do things like time-lapse and stitch

08:53

together a number of stills that is

08:55

what's gonna allow you to have an

08:56

appealing or an appeasing looking time

08:58

lapse to the eye is using that shutter

09:00

interval is what's gonna allow you to

09:02

say I'm taking one shot every one second

09:04

or I'm taking one shot every five

09:06

seconds or one shot every ten seconds

09:08

that change in interval will dictate how

09:11

much you compress time and I'm gonna

09:12

show you a great example here that was

09:14

also from Mark and notice that it's a

09:16

mall scene here where he first starts

09:18

out with a faster shutter maybe a one

09:20

over 102 a one over fifty closer towards

09:23

that one over 48 for a traditional 180

09:26

degree motion and notice that at the

09:28

faster shutters it looks a little has

09:30

that staccato kind of look or a chunky

09:32

kind of a look once he gets closer

09:34

towards or one over 48 or a 1/2 second

09:37

shutter motion blur comes back in and we

09:39

get a much more appealing looking time

09:41

lapse I will say when he starts to

09:43

change his shutter and or change his

09:45

interval or the gaps in what he's

09:47

recording notice that the people

09:49

or that the in the scenes start to

09:51

disappear so I'm gonna go ahead and show

09:53

you that now and what you should see is

09:55

like I said first the changes in the

09:57

shutter notice that everything looks a

09:59

little chunky at first here and as we

10:01

start to slow down our shutter more

10:03

towards that traditional 180 degrees

10:05

maybe even a little bit slower

10:07

notice how motion blur comes back in as

10:09

we start to change our interval here

10:11

from one second to two two five to

10:14

eventually ten people that move at

10:16

normal pace tend to disappear now notice

10:19

this gentleman outside walking across

10:21

the street up at the signal this is

10:22

twenty three nine eight recording at a

10:24

hundred and eighty degrees shutter it

10:26

looks like everything you normally see

10:28

now we're seeing a number of still

10:30

images that were taken all at faster

10:32

shutters and notice there's no motion

10:34

blur we need that motion blur to have an

10:36

appealing looking time lapse here and as

10:38

we go back to motion you're gonna see

10:40

that at a one over a thousand that one

10:42

over 250 as we slow down our shutter

10:45

we're inducing more of that blur but

10:47

we're getting a much more traditional

10:49

looking time lapse like our eyes and our

10:51

brains are used to seeing some great

10:58

examples from mark here and I and notice

11:01

here as motion blur comes back in we're

11:03

starting to get more of that traditional

11:05

looking shot now I want to take it back

11:07

to my camera in full here and thank

11:10

everyone for sitting through those first

11:11

few examples here and and really it's

11:14

understanding shutter versus interval

11:16

and I want to bring up this great

11:18

graphic for shutter here and really this

11:20

is the best way that I can go ahead and

11:21

represent it notice that you have the

11:23

45-degree shutter on the top versus the

11:26

360 degree as we get closer towards that

11:29

360 degree we're gonna have more of that

11:32

motion blur that we need for a time

11:34

lapse notice at the bottom of the frame

11:36

I also have your angle as well as your

11:38

integration time and notice that as we

11:40

get closer towards that 180 of a 270

11:42

degree shutter we're gonna have much

11:44

more of that appealing looking time

11:45

lapse with that long exposure type of

11:47

look now I want to show you how you can

11:49

go ahead and set up your cameras to go

11:51

ahead and do these type of time lapses

11:53

and really I've got a dsm serie monstro

11:55

right here to my right so it's a very

11:57

easy setup to go ahead and do now before

11:59

I go ahead and do this I'm gonna show

12:01

you a couple of methods to do timeline

12:03

there is the easy method which is

12:05

literally just changing your recorded

12:06

frames per second there's our internal

12:08

time-lapse timer mode and then we'll get

12:10

into our frame processing modes like

12:12

frame summing and frame averaging which

12:14

can allow us to have that long exposure

12:16

kind of look by recording multiple

12:18

frames or capturing multiple frames and

12:20

combining them into one now let's go

12:22

ahead and navigate right over into my

12:23

menus here and right off the bat you

12:25

should see me in the upper left hand

12:27

corner and then you should see my camera

12:29

coming over here live now if it looks

12:31

traditional it's because it is we're

12:33

shooting 2398 recording up top 23 9 8

12:36

playback down at the bottom I can also

12:38

see that I have my shutter setup as an

12:40

integration time or as a fraction I did

12:43

that intentionally because now if I hit

12:45

record this is a hundred and eighty

12:47

degree shutter normal 23 nine eight

12:49

playback now if I wanted to very quickly

12:51

and I apologize for turning my head go

12:53

into my easy method all I have to do is

12:56

take that 23 nine eight take it all the

12:58

way down to one frames per second and

13:00

now I'm essentially shooting a 1 over 24

13:03

or a time-lapse that's gonna be sped up

13:05

24 times now notice when I did that

13:08

though field of view didn't change but

13:11

look didn't change yes the shutter

13:13

didn't change because I did that

13:14

intentionally if you have it set up as

13:16

an angle and you go from 23 9 8 and you

13:19

have a hundred and eighty degrees

13:20

shutter you will want to notice that

13:22

your exposure does change as you go down

13:24

to one frames per second because you're

13:26

no longer at that one over 48 you're now

13:27

at a 1 over 2 or 1/2 second shutter and

13:30

you may need to do a head and do a black

13:32

shade so this is why I call it the easy

13:34

method I literally had to change one

13:35

parameter and to get back to normal

13:38

continuous motion all I do is come right

13:40

back to 23 9 8 very quick way to fire

13:43

off that quick quick shot just notice

13:45

that I did not control my shutter there

13:47

very well so I will still have that

13:49

clunky chunky staccato kind of look the

13:51

next form of internal time-lapse timer

13:54

mode or the next way that I want to show

13:56

you how you can go ahead and set up your

13:58

camera for doing time lapse would be

14:00

come down here into the recording mode

14:01

and I apologize that I'm doing this a

14:03

little upside-down and backwards here

14:04

but notice that right now we're shooting

14:06

continuous motion if I wanted to get

14:08

away from doing that I'm gonna come over

14:10

here and change this from continuous

14:12

motion to internal time-lapse timer mode

14:15

now this is giving me a lot more control

14:17

here because notice I can control the

14:19

amount of recorded frames as well as my

14:21

interval now the recorded frames is do

14:24

you want a flash of time-lapse or do you

14:26

want a chunk of time-lapse for this

14:28

exercise and for the solitaire series

14:30

let's just focus on recording one frame

14:32

at first and then let's focus on

14:34

controlling our interval so if I come

14:36

down here and set my interval to one

14:39

frame every one second this is gonna

14:41

look very similar to my easy time lapse

14:44

essentially it's gonna be sped up 24

14:46

times when I bring that into my playback

14:48

sequence I didn't change my shutter here

14:51

so it will still have that staccato kind

14:53

of look now I'll show you some visual

14:54

examples for this so just just just hang

14:56

in there real quick and notice that if I

14:58

wanted to speed up or I didn't think the

15:00

compression of time was fast enough all

15:02

I have to do is change this from one

15:04

second to two seconds from two seconds

15:07

to five seconds from five seconds to ten

15:09

seconds as I do that I'm speeding up how

15:12

quick my time-lapse is gonna go and

15:14

really if I wanted to see a good

15:16

representation of this all I have to do

15:19

is go back to playback and right before

15:20

the stream happened I went off and fired

15:22

a couple of these time lapses here and

15:24

what I'll just go ahead and do is

15:26

navigate down to my thumbnails here go

15:29

all the way back up to my very first

15:31

shot and if you take one look at this

15:33

very first shot it should look like 23

15:36

nine eight and twenty three nine eight

15:37

with your 180 degree shutter let's go

15:40

down here and click play so this is your

15:43

180 degree shutter notice my field of

15:46

view my look my everything is nice where

15:48

I want it to be and there I am walking

15:50

into my scene if I want to go forward

15:52

one frame I went ahead and did the easy

15:55

time lapse notice there's no shift in my

15:57

image no shift in my exposure I will

16:00

have that staccato kind of a look to it

16:02

here but very quickly that's me putting

16:06

on the gorgeous atlas anamorphic Orion

16:08

lens on there as well as changing out

16:10

the battery now that did take a decent

16:12

amount of time and if I want to speed

16:14

that up all I have to do is change the

16:16

interval where I'm no longer shooting

16:18

one frame every one second let's go one

16:20

frame every two this next one that imma

16:23

show you should go twice as fast and you

16:25

will notice that as we increase our

16:27

interval people and things

16:30

move at everyday motion start to

16:32

disappear that was the same time lapse

16:34

I'll do that same exact motion notice

16:36

how much quicker that was yes because I

16:38

have five second or 10 second intervals

16:41

within or gaps within my interval and

16:43

you'll see it here with the last example

16:46

look at how quick this time lapse goes

16:52

right so interval is how we control our

16:56

compression of time shutter is how we

16:58

control our motion blur now what have

17:00

happens if we want to do a little bit of

17:02

both what happens if we want to go back

17:04

to continuous motion but we want that

17:06

long exposure kind of look that's where

17:08

I'm gonna start talking to you about our

17:09

frame processing and our advanced

17:11

recording modes now to set those up I do

17:14

want to point out that right now I'm

17:16

shooting 8k with this gorgeous

17:17

anamorphic Atlas lens now normally if

17:20

you're going to do frame processing you

17:22

do have to come out of 8k resolution

17:24

typically right around 5k but because

17:27

this is an amorphous and I'm doing the

17:29

2x2 squeeze I don't have to come down in

17:31

resolution I just want to point that out

17:33

in case anyone at home tries to do this

17:34

and realize is that they can't do frame

17:36

processing at 8k so to do that you're

17:39

gonna go menu recording mode we've

17:45

already got an internal time lapse timer

17:47

you're gonna come here into frame

17:49

processing and right now it's no frame

17:51

processing if I come down here and do

17:53

frames summing frames summing and frame

17:56

processing is something that we've done

17:58

with DSLRs and still cameras for some

18:01

time that's frame blending or recording

18:03

multiple frames and processes processing

18:06

it into one we're doing that now in

18:08

camera but with frame processing were

18:10

capturing multiple frames and even

18:13

before it's recorded to the mag those

18:14

frames are combined to give us that long

18:17

exposure look potentially a brighter

18:19

image or maybe even a cleaner image so

18:21

frame summing is the first one we're

18:23

gonna do and right now we're frame

18:25

summing a 1 over 6 or 16 frames now as I

18:29

go back to my menu here notice that I'm

18:31

shooting one frame at the 1 over 48

18:34

times 16 148 times 16 could also be

18:39

represented as 16 over 48

18:42

or a 1/3 of a second shutter if I hit

18:46

record right now I'm gonna combine all

18:48

16 of those frames and essentially get

18:51

an image that's gonna be four times

18:52

brighter if I did want to go ahead and

18:55

process eight frames it'd be about three

18:58

stops brighter if I did four frames two

19:01

stops brighter and two frames would be

19:03

one stop brighter because once again

19:04

frames summing is combining those

19:07

overall integration times I will show

19:10

you guys all visual representations for

19:12

all this I just wanted to show you how

19:13

to set it up first the next mode that

19:16

we're gonna go ahead and set up is frame

19:19

averaging now frame averaging isn't

19:22

gonna make your image brighter and as we

19:24

navigate back to my menu here notice I

19:27

still have that one over 48 shutter the

19:29

difference here is I can maybe go over

19:31

to my ISO and shoot a much higher ISO

19:35

maybe something like 3200 4000 6400 if

19:39

you dare and essentially we all know

19:41

that a higher ISO that high I'm gonna

19:43

start getting some noise and potentially

19:45

some grain details that I maybe don't

19:47

like by using frame averaging I'm gonna

19:49

take those 16 frames combine them and

19:52

effectively get a less noise in my shot

19:55

now I'm gonna go ahead and show you some

19:57

examples of this and I want to go ahead

19:58

and go back to my desktop here and what

20:01

you're gonna notice is a series of time

20:02

lapses first the continuous motion then

20:04

the easy time lapse then I play with the

20:07

shutter as well as going to the frame

20:09

processing mode so I'm going to go ahead

20:10

and show you the full the full capture

20:12

of all the different modes so right off

20:17

the bat you should see continuous

20:19

recording I'm recording 23 9 8 frames

20:21

and I'm playing back in 23 9 8 notice

20:24

it's that same one over 48 shutter and

20:26

I'm walking up and down the street now

20:30

I've easily transitioned into my easy

20:31

time lapse where I'm only recording one

20:33

frame and I'm playing it back at 24

20:36

frames per second this is essentially

20:38

compressed 24 times now I've gone into

20:41

the internal time lapse mode and notice

20:43

that I'm first doing a 1 over 48 at 2

20:46

seconds then at 5 seconds and then at 10

20:49

and notice as we get towards 5 or 10

20:51

seconds I tend to disappear so to the

20:54

cars at around 5 to 10

20:56

in intervals you will notice things like

20:58

people and cars tend to disappear

21:00

because every five to ten seconds

21:02

they've completely cleared your frame so

21:04

it's a great way if you want people or

21:06

things to disappear change your interval

21:08

and they will just look like ghosts in

21:09

your image I've now gone into frame

21:12

averaging and a key thing to notice

21:14

there's no way to do frame processing

21:15

and not have that long exposure type of

21:17

look but notice that I'm now shooting

21:20

later at night with a much higher ISO

21:22

and I'm not having a that noise floor be

21:25

nearly as a parent I'm not having to

21:27

deal with as much of that that grain

21:30

directly right out of camera so this is

21:32

our frame averaging and then I'm gonna

21:34

wait a couple of more hours here as it

21:36

gets darker and start doing frame

21:38

summing I will say that frame summing

21:40

was much later in the night and know

21:42

that it's about four stops brighter than

21:44

what I originally intended and I just

21:46

went over to frame summing and you can

21:48

see that one over 48 times 16 which is

21:51

your 16 over 48 which is effectively the

21:54

integration time of a one third of a

21:56

second some great examples there and I

22:02

want to thank everyone I'm seeing some

22:04

good questions and some answers being

22:05

answered by Johnny thank you for

22:07

handling those in the chat and I want to

22:11

go ahead and let this wrap up here and

22:13

we'll watch the car take off and take it

22:15

back to my camera and full now I just

22:17

showed you several ways that you could

22:19

go ahead and utilize your camera to do

22:21

time-lapse recording now time-lapse is

22:23

something that's that's great and it's

22:25

something that we use in narratives to

22:27

compress a period of time or maybe use

22:29

to go from one scene to another it's

22:32

definitely a very valuable narrative

22:34

tool and I don't want to have to always

22:36

go get a different camera system and do

22:38

a bait and swap when I'm trying to make

22:39

an overall effective image that's why

22:41

it's great to utilize the tools that we

22:43

have right within our DSM C 2 and our

22:45

range of camera systems now when could I

22:48

use frame processing when I don't want

22:50

to use time-lapse now you heard me say

22:52

it earlier I'm recording multiple frames

22:55

or capturing multiple frames and

22:57

combining them into one so anytime

22:58

you're doing that you're gonna have a

23:00

ghosting effect so just know that frame

23:03

processing unless you're doing anything

23:05

that doesn't move like maybe

23:06

architecture or Astro photography really

23:09

slow

23:09

mean things or maybe desktop photography

23:12

or anything creative where you actually

23:14

like that trailing effect frame

23:16

processing will give you that effect the

23:18

more frames you process the more the

23:21

more of that long exposure gonna get

23:22

you're gonna get now I want to show you

23:24

something on my desktop here and this is

23:27

a great example here of anyone that's

23:30

ever shot a red nose that you probably

23:32

would have liked to have not shown shot

23:34

at 6400 ISO now this is just a quick

23:37

little ABC store snow globe and a couple

23:40

of plumerias from my yard but as I'm

23:43

looking at this shot right here I would

23:45

much rather either say to the creative

23:47

director of my DP or whoever is I'm

23:49

working with can we bring in some more

23:51

lights can I open up on my lens nope

23:54

the lens is all the way open we can't

23:56

bring any more lights this is your shot

23:58

if I go ahead and zoom in here or I

24:00

don't even really have to because the

24:01

next slides better you can see that no

24:03

frame processing over here versus 16

24:06

frames processed over here the image

24:08

should look cleaner over here with less

24:10

chroma noise and if you can't see it

24:12

very well in here my next slide it

24:13

should be a little bit more apparent and

24:15

I will zoom in no frame processing

24:17

versus 16 frames of processing and this

24:20

is using frame averaging and look what

24:24

happens when we zoom in here look at all

24:26

the chroma noise in this in a snow globe

24:28

look at all of this red and blue in this

24:31

plumeria leave that should not be here

24:33

if I do frame processing and look at

24:36

that same shot look at the difference

24:38

between this pedal and this one over

24:40

here I would much rather use the one

24:42

that has taken 16 frames combined it and

24:46

average to get an overall cleaner

24:47

looking image here for anyone that's

24:51

ever shot on red and checked their

24:52

exposure metering curious to see what I

24:54

was seeing in camera this was my

24:56

exposure before I even shot now anyone

25:00

that remembers Johnny's Johnny's

25:02

explanation on our red tools here this

25:04

is our exposure meter anything that

25:06

purple on a scale of 1 to 10 is saying

25:08

hey are on a scale of 0 to 100 is less

25:11

than 10 I re essentially everything

25:13

that's purple is going to be noisy or

25:15

have some loss of you're in your detail

25:17

and look at what I have here this is my

25:20

camera tell me you who you're going to

25:21

have noise and all of this per

25:23

stuff and by using frame processing look

25:26

at how much cleaner the 16 frames is

25:28

versus the no frame processing once

25:33

again my snow globe and my plumerias

25:35

didn't move a whole heck of a lot so

25:37

that's how I was able to use frame

25:38

averaging and this was how I was able to

25:41

get an overall effectively cleaner image

25:43

well I want to take it back to my camera

25:46

in full and see if there's been any

25:48

other questions here

25:49

love frame average me really enjoy

25:51

playing this yeah great question that

25:54

just came in through the chat wins

25:55

another great time to use frame

25:57

processing frame averaging I find that

26:00

it's a very valuable tool for things

26:03

like campfire scenes right now once

26:05

again here's a campfire in the middle of

26:07

nowhere

26:08

that fire is putting off good light but

26:10

how do I get all the people around the

26:11

fire without introducing new lights how

26:14

do I get the sky escape and the stars

26:16

moving behind him when I can barely see

26:18

him with my naked eye frame summing

26:21

would allow me to combine all of my

26:22

effective integration times to get an

26:24

overall brighter image frame averaging

26:27

would take all of those frames and get

26:29

me an effectively cleaner image I hope

26:31

that helps explain it and it's also

26:33

something that I use for maybe I'm

26:35

trying to convey a fractured mind or a

26:37

distressed person I can use that to get

26:39

a very make someone hold still and then

26:42

have everything else buzz and move

26:43

around them really great creative tool

26:45

just notice that if you have movement

26:47

you will have that long exposure kind of

26:50

a look I'm gonna look over to my left

26:54

and see if there's any questions here I

26:55

know I was Gavin for about 26 minutes

26:58

straight here but I want to thank

27:00

everyone for tuning in initially this

27:01

has been a great great start to our

27:03

solitary series on time-lapse and

27:05

advanced recording let's see here see if

27:09

there's any other questions here

27:18

yeah I see in a question here on when is

27:21

the proper time to do this in black

27:23

shade and just notice that York as I go

27:26

back to my camera menu here and I'm

27:28

gonna go back to my camera over here

27:30

live let's just go back to my normal

27:32

recording mode and I'm just gonna go

27:35

back to continuous motion so I mean

27:39

recording 2398 and I'm doing no frame

27:41

processing and so right now if you guys

27:49

can see my camera menus here you should

27:51

see that both my temperature and my

27:53

exposure value are both saying that

27:55

they're green and they're happy if I go

27:57

ahead and do the easy time-lapse mode

27:59

and take this down to one frames per

28:02

second notice that my tea and my e did

28:04

not change if I did want to go ahead and

28:07

make this a hundred and eighty degree

28:08

shutter watch what happens to my E and

28:11

you're seeing it right there as I take

28:13

it down to a half second my ei is now

28:15

gone red it's prompting me that hey you

28:19

should go ahead and probably do a black

28:21

shade here I will say that I have my

28:23

camera set up to do automatic black

28:25

shades because I'm doing so many

28:26

demonstrations that I'm constantly

28:28

changing my shutter drastically so I'm

28:30

using the auto black shade for best

28:32

results I would probably say go ahead

28:34

and take the 15 minutes and do a manual

28:36

black shade if you are gonna do anything

28:39

around 1/2 or 1/3 second exposure let me

28:43

take it back to my camera in full there

28:51

yeah this is a great questions here if

28:53

anyone has any more questions we're

28:55

right around the 30 minute mark I try

28:57

and keep these around 30 minutes or less

28:58

so please feel free to keep asking those

29:00

questions I've got my DSM c2 monstro

29:04

right here to my right I've got a Gemini

29:06

that I'm pointing at right there and a

29:08

ranger camera system here sitting behind

29:10

me and essentially all three of these

29:11

cameras you can do the exact same thing

29:13

with the exact same look and have a

29:15

preset that bounces between all three

29:17

cameras that way when I want to very

29:19

quickly do my time lapse mode I'm not

29:21

having to poke around on my camera we

29:23

already learned how we could set up

29:24

presets and have that be set up as a

29:26

soft key or something to very easily

29:28

transition not a time lapse question but

29:34

how do you set up seven k-frame dies

29:36

when shooting an 8k great question

29:38

thanks for asking that Brian essentially

29:40

here all we're gonna do is come over

29:42

here into our monitoring menu and you're

29:45

going to go into the overlays come over

29:50

here into guides and there's a couple

29:52

different ways that you could set up

29:53

your frame guide you could do absolute

29:55

where you just type in 7k right where I

29:58

would put in the 1796 by whatever it is

30:01

you can also come in here and just pick

30:04

an aspect ratio like let's say I want to

30:06

keep the sixteen by nine but I want to

30:08

do a 75% or a 15% scale one oops fifteen

30:21

percent and I'm gonna click OK and we'll

30:26

come down here and make this blue and

30:27

I'm gonna make this a hundred percent so

30:29

you can see this Brian and I very

30:31

quickly hope just did a I I did the

30:34

wrong percentage there I should have

30:35

done 85 percent rather than fifteen

30:36

percent but you can see my little blue

30:38

box there and let's go ahead and change

30:40

that back guides and I want to make this

30:51

and there you can see my sixteen by nine

30:53

frame guy that I just went ahead and

30:55

added there and if there's a little

30:57

bright I can go ahead and stop down just

30:59

a smidge here so you can see that frame

31:00

guy that I just went ahead there and

31:02

created yeah so there is commonly the

31:09

still well why don't you do this with

31:10

stills you could do that with your still

31:12

camera I think a key thing to remember

31:14

here remember from the last solitary

31:16

series every raw capture with that still

31:18

image right around fifty megabytes every

31:21

raw still with a read seven megabytes

31:24

anytime I take that still and bring it

31:26

into a photo color correction program

31:29

it's instantly gonna jump to two hundred

31:31

and fifty megabytes what I just showed

31:33

you here I was doing a first light and

31:35

red cine X all with the raw file

31:37

bringing it into premiere still with the

31:39

raw and doing a total export where I

31:42

didn't have to grow my files

31:43

exponentially I was able to keep them

31:45

all raw my total project might be less

31:48

than 20 gigs whereas if I was doing that

31:50

with my DSLR I'm gonna have a much

31:52

bigger total project file because I'm

31:55

not using the benefit of red code to

31:56

keep my files smaller

32:03

great question on the auto calibration

32:06

I'm actually I'm actually gonna leave

32:08

that one Sameer for Johnny Johnny's

32:11

gonna do a great solitaire series and

32:12

the next coming weeks here on read

32:14

fundamentals and I know that black

32:15

shading is one of them I will say for

32:17

best results the ops guide at red does

32:20

recommend using a manual black shade for

32:23

all three of the sensors Gemini helium

32:26

and monstro dragon X I do believe is

32:28

still the one that they say you can use

32:29

the auto calibration but once again I

32:31

use auto calibration why because I'm

32:34

very I just did it right here I went

32:36

from a 1/2 second to a 1 over 8,000 and

32:39

I don't want to have to stop for 15

32:41

minutes or 30 minutes to do a black

32:42

shade I'm able to do that and have it

32:44

Auto calibrate I'm also just doing a

32:47

live stream where I'm not providing my

32:49

best results on to someone else here and

32:51

they're gonna go ahead and nitpick and

32:52

look at them all at a hundred percent

32:54

for best results and it's gonna have

32:56

your name on it Samir I would say take

32:58

the 15 minutes to let your camera boot

33:00

up get ready at the proper temperature

33:02

and then do a manual black shade to have

33:04

the best results

33:14

you know it's it's a great question for

33:17

mark you know it's not necessarily

33:18

something where like with your DSLR or

33:22

with your other cameras where you're

33:23

gonna have to change your aperture if I

33:26

go back here to red cine X I want to

33:28

show you that when I set up these shots

33:31

I'm not I don't have any aperture

33:33

control I'm not I'm not using a Kessler

33:37

you know shoot move shoot crane where

33:39

I'm slowly changing my exposure really

33:41

I'm doing this all with either ISO or

33:45

doing this later in post

33:47

now remember 12,800 ISO if I go down to

33:50

3200 or 6400 that's one stop 6400 to

33:55

3200 that's another stop 3200 to 1600

33:59

every time I'm doing this I'm going down

34:01

in a stop here and I don't know if you

34:03

guys are noticing this this is a from

34:05

just after sunset to all the way

34:09

complete black at night I didn't have to

34:11

change my aperture and if I changed my

34:13

aperture we all know that that would

34:14

have effect on my depth of field it's

34:16

pretty nice to have that 16 stops of

34:18

dynamic range coupled by the fact that

34:21

this is raw and I can change my ISO

34:23

value at any point and just notice that

34:25

I did all of these shots using frame

34:27

averaging so that's why I'm able to take

34:29

them up to such high high ISO s and

34:31

bring them down and have them be so

34:33

clean all of this was still using frame

34:35

an automatic black shade and that's also

34:39

why you're not noticing any uh any noise

34:42

or in any of those shots well I want to

34:47

thank everyone so far this has been a

34:49

great great solitaire series I'm gonna

34:51

look over to my left and see if there's

34:52

any more questions from my crew here ah

34:55

great question how would I technically

34:58

compare it or rate it to read HDR mode

35:00

HDR mode is essentially what's gonna

35:03

allow us to capture two tracks at the

35:05

same time but it's gonna let us have

35:07

less control of our shutter for this

35:09

exercise I did not do HDR in here you

35:12

could do HDR X or HDR X I want to be

35:15

clear here HDR X is a feature within red

35:18

cameras which allows us to record to two

35:21

different tracks at the same time and

35:23

combine them in the same video stream

35:24

you're able to do this but it you are

35:26

limited on your shutters

35:28

you also cannot do HD rx with that frame

35:31

processing so you could definitely use

35:33

HD rx with that easy time lapse mode

35:35

it's something that you can go ahead and

35:37

do you're just gonna lose as much

35:40

control of your shutter and that's where

35:42

I would say go ahead and try just using

35:43

the internal time lapse timer mode first

35:45

use a very very fast lens and if you

35:48

still can't get the result then try and

35:50

use the HDR X mode but once again

35:51

remember 16 and a half stops a dynamic

35:54

range and that's before I even started

35:56

using any of these frame processing

35:57

modes great question imagination I'm not

36:04

going to talk about anything Komodo I've

36:06

worked with read long enough to know

36:08

that that's Jarrod's Jarrod's department

36:10

right now so any questions on Komodo

36:12

please stay tuned follow jared on his

36:15

socials and would love to talk about

36:17

that when we can't but unfortunately all

36:25

right well I want to thank everyone I'm

36:27

not seeing a whole bunch of other

36:28

questions come in this has been a great

36:30

solitaire series Jonny if there's any

36:32

last questions send them to me now if

36:34

not I'm going to go ahead and wrap it up

36:35

thank you all for tuning in thank you -

36:38

thank you - mark thank you - Dylan thank

36:41

you - Jason Sameer you guys all provided

36:43

great great questions this has been a

36:45

wonderful wonderful solitaire series

36:47

we're gonna look forward to Jonathon

36:49

pets doing our next one on read

36:50

fundamentals and this is James Lucarelli

36:53

thanking you all for tuning in to

36:54

another solitaire series have a great

36:56

rest of your day

37:05

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